Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-x9ds4 Total loading time: 0.405 Render date: 2023-02-02T18:11:11.652Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Integrating fall and spring herbicides with a cereal rye cover crop for horseweed (Conyza canadensis) management prior to soybean

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 November 2019

Austin D. Sherman
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA
Erin R. Haramoto*
Affiliation:
Assistant Professor, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA
J. D. Green
Affiliation:
Professor, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Erin R. Haramoto, Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky, 1405 Veterans Drive, Lexington, KY, 40546. (E-mail: erin.haramoto@uky.edu)

Abstract

Horseweed is one of Kentucky’s most common and problematic weeds in no-till soybean production systems. Emergence in the fall and spring necessitates control at these times because horseweed is best managed when small. Control is typically achieved through herbicides or cover crops (CCs); integrating these practices can lead to more sustainable weed management. Two years of field experiments were conducted over 2016 to 2017 and 2017 to 2018 in Versailles, KY, to examine the use of fall herbicide (FH; namely, saflufenacil or none), spring herbicide (SH; namely, 2,4-D; dicamba; or none), and CC (namely, cereal rye or none) for horseweed management prior to soybean. Treatments were examined with a fully factorial design to assess potential interactions. The CC biomass in 2016 to 2017 was higher relative to 2017 to 2018 and both herbicide programs reduced winter weed biomass in that year. The CC reduced horseweed density while growing and after termination in 1 yr. The FH reduced horseweed density through mid-spring. The FH also killed winter weeds that may have suppressed horseweed emergence; higher horseweed density resulted by soybean planting unless the CC was present to suppress the additional spring emergence. If either FH or CC was used, SH typically did not result in additional horseweed control. The SH killed emerged plants but did not provide residual control of a late horseweed flush in 2017 to 2018. These results suggest CCs can help manage spring flushes of horseweed emergence when nonresidual herbicide products are used, though this effect was short-lived when less CC biomass was present.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2019 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

Associate Editor: William Johnson, Purdue University

References

Anonymous (2014) Sharpen® herbicide product label. BASF Corporation, Research Triangle Park, NC Google Scholar
Baraibar, B, Hunter, MC, Schipanski, ME, Hamilton, A, Mortensen, D (2018) Weed suppression in cover crop monocultures and mixtures. Weed Sci 66:121133 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blanco-Canqui, H, Shaver, TM, Lindquist, JL, Shapiro, CA, Elmore, RW, Francis, CA, Hergert, GW (2015) Cover crop and ecosystem services: insights from studies in temperate soils. Agron J 107:24492474 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bolte, JD (2015) Emergence and Control of Horseweed (Conyza canadensis (L.) Cronq). MS thesis. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri. 157 pGoogle Scholar
Brainard, DC, Bakker, J, Noyes, DC, Myers, N (2012) Rye living mulch effects on soil moisture and weeds in asparagus. HortSci 47:5863 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bruce, JA, Kells, JJ (1990) Horseweed (Conyza canadensis) control in no-tillage soybeans (Glycine max) with preplant and preemergence herbicides. Weed Technol 4:642647 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Byker, HP, Soltani, N, Robinson, DE, Tardif, FJ, Lawton, MB (2013) Control of glyphosate-resistant horseweed (Conyza canadensis) with dicamba applied preplant and postemergence in dicamba-resistant soybean. Weed Technol 27:492496 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cholette, TB, Soltani, N, Hooker, DC, Robinson, DE, Sikkema, PH (2018) Suppression of glyphosate-resistant Canada fleabane (Conyza canadensis) in corn with cover crops seeded after wheat harvest the previous year. Weed Technol 32:244250 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cornelius, CD, Bradley, KW (2017) Influence of various cover crop species on winter and summer annual weed emergence in soybean. Weed Technol 31:503513 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, VM, Gibson, KD, Bauman, TT, Weller, SC, Johnson, WG (2007) Influence of weed management practices and crop rotation on glyphosate-resistant horseweed population dynamics and crop yield. Weed Sci 55:508516 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, VM, Johnson, WG (2008) Glyphosate-resistant horseweed (Conyza canadensis) emergence, survival, and fecundity, in no-till soybeans. Weed Sci 56:231236 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, VM, Gibson, KD, Bauman, TT, Weller, SC, Johnson, WG (2009) Influence of weed management practices and crop rotation on glyphosate-resistant horseweed (Conyza canadensis) population dynamics and crop yield – years III and IV. Weed Sci 57: 417426 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, VM, Kruger, GR, Young, BG, Johnson, WG (2010) Fall and spring preplant herbicide applications influence spring emergence of glyphosate-resistant horseweed (Conyza canadensis). Weed Technol 24:1119 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haramoto, ER (2019) Species, seeding rate, and planting method influence cover crop services prior to soybean. Agron J 111: 10681078 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haramoto, ER, Brainard, DC (2017) Spatial and temporal variability in Powell amaranth (Amaranthus powellii) emergence under strip tillage with cover crop residue. Weed Sci 65:151163 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haramoto, ER, Sherman, AD, Green, JD (2019) 2,4-D Deposition is reduced and more variable immediately adjacent to cereal rye cover crop rows [published online ahead of print August 23, 2019]. Weed Technol DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/wet.2019.82 Google Scholar
Hasty, RF, Sprague, CL, Hager, AG (2004) Weed control with fall and early-preplant herbicide applications in no-till soybean. Weed Technol 18:887892 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hayden, ZD, Brainard, DC, Henshaw, B, Ngouajio, M (2012) Winter annual weed suppression in rye–vetch cover crop mixtures. Weed Technol 26:818825 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heap, IM (2019) The international survey of herbicide resistant weeds. http://www.weedscience.org. Accessed: July 9, 2019Google Scholar
Jasieniuk, M, Brule-Babel, AL, Morrison, IN (1996) The evolution and genetics of herbicide resistance in weeds. Weed Sci 44:176193 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Legleiter, TR, Green, JD (2019) Investigation of Conyza canadensis control in Kentucky no-till soybean across three herbicide resistant soybean varieties. 59th Annual Meeting of the Weed Science Society of America, February 11–14, New Orleans, LA. Paper 220Google Scholar
Loux, M, Johnson, WG (2010) Control of marestail in no-till soybeans. Purdue University Extension & Ohio State University Extension. https://ag.purdue.edu/btny/weedscience/Documents/marestail%20fact%202014%20latest.pdf. Accessed: August 1, 2018Google Scholar
Main, CL, Steckel, LE, Hayes, RM, Mueller, TC (2006) Biotic and abiotic factors influence horseweed emergence. Weed Sci 54:11011105 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Martin, J (2013) Marestail may challenge wheat growers this fall. Wheat Science News 17. University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service. https://wheatscience.ca.uky.edu/files/sept2092c20201320newsletter.pdf. Accessed: December 20, 2019Google Scholar
Martin, J, Green, JD (2016) Weed control recommendations for Kentucky grain crops. Lexington, KY: University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Cooperative Extension Service, Publication 82Google Scholar
Maxwell, B, Roush, ML, Radosevich, SR (1990) Predicting the evolution and dynamics of herbicide resistance in weed populations. Weed Technol 4:213 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mellendorf, TG, Young, JM, Matthews, JL, Young, BG (2013) Influence of plant height and glyphosate on saflufenacil efficacy on glyphosate-resistant horseweed (Conyza canadensis). Weed Technol 27:463467 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nandula, VK, Eubank, TW, Poston, DH, Koger, CH, Reddy, KN (2006) Factors affecting germination of horseweed (Conyza canadensis). Weed Sci 54:898902 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norsworthy, JK, Ward, SM, Shaw, DR, Llewellyn, RS, Nichols, RL, Webster, TM, Bradley, KW, Frisvold, G, Powles, SB, Burgos, NR, Witt, WW, Barrett, M (2012) Reducing the risks of herbicide resistance: best management practices and recommendations. Weed Sci 60(sp1):3162 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Regehr, DL, Bazzaz, FA (1979) The population dynamics of Erigeron canadensis, a successional winter annual. J Ecol 3:923933 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Riar, DS, Norsworthy, JK, Steckel, LE, Stephenson, DO IV, Eubank, TW, Scott, RC (2013) Assessment of weed management practices and problem weeds in the midsouth United States-soybean: a consultant’s perspective. Weed Technol 27:612622 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ryan, MR, Mirsky, SB, Mortensen, DA, Teasdale, JR, Curran, WS (2011) Potential synergistic effects of cereal rye biomass and soybean planting density on weed suppression. Weed Sci 59:238246 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sarrantonio, M, Gallandt, ER (2003) The role of cover crops in North American cropping systems. J Crop Prod 8:5374 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shields, EJ, Dauer, JT, VanGessel, MJ, Neumann, G (2006) Horseweed (Conyza canadensis) seed collected in the planetary boundary layer. Weed Sci 54:10631067 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Teasdale, JR, Mohler, CL (2000) The quantitative relationship between weed emergence and the physical properties of mulches. Weed Sci 48:385392 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tozzi, E, Van Acker, RC (2014) Effects of seedling emergence timing on the population dynamics of horseweed (Conyza canadensis var. canadensis ) Weed Sci 62:451456 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
VanGessel, MJ (2001) Glyphosate-resistant horseweed from Delaware. Weed Sci 49:703705 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Wychen, L (2016) 2016 Survey of the Most Common and Troublesome Weeds in Broadleaf Crops, Fruits & Vegetables in the United States and Canada. Weed Science Society of America National Weed Survey Dataset. http://wssa.net/wp-content/uploads/2016-Weed-Survey_Broadleaf-crops.xlsx. Accessed: July 9, 2019Google Scholar
Vollmer, KM, VanGessel, MJ, Johnson, QR, Scott, BA (2019) Preplant and residual herbicide application timings for weed control in no-till soybean. Weed Technol 33:166172 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wallace, JM, Curran, WS, Mortensen, DA (2019) Cover crop effects on horseweed (Erigeron Canadensis) density and size inequality at the time of herbicide exposure. Weed Sci 67:327338 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Webster, TM, Simmons, DB, Culpepper, AS, Grey, TL, Bridges, DC, Scully, BT (2016) Factors affecting potential for Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) suppression by winter rye in Georgia, USA. Field Crops Res 192: 103109 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wells, MS, Reberg-Horton, SC, Smith, SN, Grossman, JM (2013) The reduction of plant-available nitrogen by cover crop mulches and subsequent effects on soybean performance and weed interference. Agron J 105: 539545 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Werle, R, Burr, C, Blanco-Canqui, H (2017) Cereal rye cover crop suppresses winter annual weeds. Can J Plant Sci 8:498500 Google Scholar
Supplementary material: File

Sherman et al. Supplementary Materials

Sherman et al. Supplementary Materials

Download Sherman et al. Supplementary Materials(File)
File 18 KB
5
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Integrating fall and spring herbicides with a cereal rye cover crop for horseweed (Conyza canadensis) management prior to soybean
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Integrating fall and spring herbicides with a cereal rye cover crop for horseweed (Conyza canadensis) management prior to soybean
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Integrating fall and spring herbicides with a cereal rye cover crop for horseweed (Conyza canadensis) management prior to soybean
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *