Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-jjt9s Total loading time: 1.827 Render date: 2021-06-19T20:56:40.041Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Improved White Clover Control with Mesotrione by Tank-Mixing Bromoxynil, Carfentrazone, and Simazine

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

John B. Willis
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 435 Old Glade Road, Blacksburg, VA 24060
Shawn D. Askew
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 435 Old Glade Road, Blacksburg, VA 24060
J. Scott McElroy
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Mesotrione is under evaluation for registration in turfgrass for weed control, but often requires repeat treatments. Previous research in agricultural crops indicates tank mixtures with mesotrione improve weed control. Greenhouse trials were conducted in Blacksburg, VA, with 7 mo-old white clover, and field trials in Knoxville, TN, evaluated control of 5-yr old white clover in a stand of common bermudagrass. Data from both field and greenhouse trials indicate mesotrione applied in combination with bromoxynil, carfentrazone, or simazine control white clover better than any of these herbicides applied alone. Combinations of bromoxynil, carfentrazone, and simazine with mesotrione also decreased relative chlorophyll index and white clover fresh weights in agreement with visually estimated control.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Abendroth, J. A., Martin, A. R., and Roeth, F. W. 2006. Plant response to combinations of mesotrione with photosystem II inhibitors. Weed Technol. 20:267274.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armel, G. R., Hall, G. J., Wilson, H. P., and Cullen, N. 2005. Mesotrione plus atrazine mixtures for control of Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). Weed Sci. 53:202211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armel, G. R., Wilson, H. P., Richardson, R. J., and Hines, T. E. 2003a. Mesotrione combinations for postemergence control of horsenettle (Solanum carolinense) in corn (Zea mays). Weed Technol. 17:6572.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armel, G. R., Wilson, H. P., Richardson, R. J., and Hines, T. E. 2003b. Mesotrione, acetochlor, and atrazine for weed management in corn (Zea mays). Weed Technol. 17:284290.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Askew, S. D., Beam, J. B., and Barker, W. L. 2003. New options for seeding cool-season turfgrass in spring. Proc. South. Weed Sci. Soc. 56:85.Google Scholar
Askew, S. D., Beam, J. B., and Barker, W. L. 2004. Chemical options for selective control or suppression of bermudagrass in creeping bentgrass, Kentucky bluegrass, and perennial ryegrass. Proc. South. Weed Sci. Soc. 57:101.Google Scholar
Beam, J. B., Barker, W. L., and Askew, S. D. 2004. Postemergence crabgrass control in Kentucky bluegrass. Proc. South. Weed Sci. Soc. 57:104.Google Scholar
Beam, J. B., Barker, W. L., and Askew, S. D. 2006. Selective creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) control in cool-season turfgrass. Weed Technol. 20:340344.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bhowmik, P. C. and Drohen, J. A. 2001. Differential response of cool-season turfgrass species to isoxaflutole. Int. Turfgrass Soc. Res. J. 9:38.Google Scholar
Devine, M. D., Duke, S. O., and Fedtke, C. 1993. Oxygen toxicity and herbicidal action. in. Physiology of Herbicide Action. Englewood Cliffs, NJ Prentice Hall. 177188.Google Scholar
Frans, R. E., Talbert, R., Marx, D., and Crowley, H. 1986. in Camper, N.D., ed. Experimental design and techniques for measuring and analyzing plant responses to weed control practices. Research Methods in Weed Science. 3rd ed. Champaign, IL Southern Weed Science Society. 3738.Google Scholar
Johnson, B. C., Young, B. G., and Matthews, J. L. 2002. Effect of postemergence application rate and timing of mesotrione on corn (Zea mays) response and weed control. Weed Technol. 16:414420.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jones, M. A. and Christians, N. E. 2005. Mesotrione kills creeping bentgrass in Kentucky bluegrass. in. Agronomy Abstracts CD-ROM. Madison, WI American Society of Agronomy, Crops Science Society of America, and Soils Science Society of America. 50. [Abstract].Google Scholar
Keese, R. J., Driver, J., and Cox, D. 2005. Mesotrione: a new herbicide active ingredient for weed control in turfgrass. Northeast. Weed Sci. Soc. 59:103.Google Scholar
Kim, J., Jung, S., Hwang, I. T., and Cho, K. Y. 1999. Characteristics of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction in cucumber cotyledons treated with diuron, norflurazon, and sulcotrionem. Pestic. Biochem. Physiol. 65:73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McElroy, J. S. 2005. The effect of mesotrione and atrazine on photosystem II efficiency of centipedegrass (Eremochloa ophiuroides). in. Agronomy Abstracts CD-ROM. Madison, WI American Society of Agronomy, Crops Science Society of America, and Soils Science Society of America. 434. [Abstract].Google Scholar
McElroy, J. S., Breeden, G. K., and Hahn, P. D. 2005. Weed control options for seeded heat-tolerant bluegrass (Poa pratensis × Poa arachnifera) establishment. Proc. Weed Sci. Soc. Am. 45:101102.Google Scholar
McIntosh, M. S. 1983. Analysis of combined experiments. Agron. J. 75:153155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pallett, K. E., Little, J. P., Sheekey, M., and Veerasekaran, P. 1998. The mode of action of isoxaflutole, I: physiological effects, metabolism, and selectivity. Pestic. Biochem. and Physiol. 62:113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stephenson, D. O., Bond, J. A., Walker, E. R., Bararpour, M. T., and Oliver, L. R. 2004. Evaluation of mesotrione in Mississippi Delta corn production. Weed Technol. 18:11111116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Trebst, A., Depka, B., and Hollander-Czytko, H. 2002. A specific role for tocopherol and of chemical singlet oxygen quenchers in the maintenance of photosystem II structure and function in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii . FEBS Lett. 516:156.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vencill, W. K. 2002. Herbicide Handbook. 8th ed. Lawrence, KS Weed Science Society of America. 6870.Google Scholar
Webster, T. M. 2004. Weed survey—southern states, grass crops subsection. Proc. South. Weed Sci. Soc. 57:423.Google Scholar
Williams, B. L., Burns, A. B., and Copes, D. B. 2004. Evaluation of mesotrione for postemergence control of winter weeds in corn. Weed Sci. Soc. Am. 54:3.Google Scholar
Willis, J. B., Askew, S. D., and McElroy, J. S. 2005a. Selective nimblewill (Muhlenbergia schreberi) control in cool-season turfgrass. Weed Sci. Soc. Am. 45:30.Google Scholar
Willis, J. B., Ricker, D. B., Askew, S. D., and Keese, R. J. 2005b. Bermudagrass control with mesotrione and potential synergists. Northeast. Weed Sci. Soc. 59:89.Google Scholar
11
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Improved White Clover Control with Mesotrione by Tank-Mixing Bromoxynil, Carfentrazone, and Simazine
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Improved White Clover Control with Mesotrione by Tank-Mixing Bromoxynil, Carfentrazone, and Simazine
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Improved White Clover Control with Mesotrione by Tank-Mixing Bromoxynil, Carfentrazone, and Simazine
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *