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Imidazolinone Herbicide Effects on Following Rotational Crops in Southern Alberta

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

James R. Moyer
Affiliation:
Agric. and Agri-Food Canada Res. Cent., Lethbridge, AB Canada T1J 4B1
Rudy Esau
Affiliation:
Crop Diversification Cent., South, Brooks, AB, Canada T1R 1E6

Abstract

The effect of imazethapyr and imazamethabenz on following crops was tested in southern Alberta, on Dark Brown and Brown Chernozemic soils, to assess the potential restrictions placed on cropping sequences by the use of these herbicides. Imazamethabenz reduced the yield of sugarbeet seeded one year after application. After imazethapyr application there is risk of yield loss with flax, corn, meadow bromegrass, mustard, sunflower, timothy, and wheat seeded one year later; canola seeded up to two years later; and sugarbeet and potato seeded up to three years later. Legume crops and intermediate wheatgrass may be seeded the year after application with little risk of yield loss. The required recropping intervals limit the use of imazethapyr for weed control in pea, alfalfa, or dry bean in cropping sequences that include sugarbeet, canola, or potato.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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