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Herbicide Programs for Enhanced Glyphosate-Resistant and Glufosinate-Resistant Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Dilpreet S. Riar*
Affiliation:
Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, 1366 West Altheimer Drive, Fayetteville, AR 72704
Jason K. Norsworthy
Affiliation:
Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, 1366 West Altheimer Drive, Fayetteville, AR 72704
Griff M. Griffith
Affiliation:
Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, 1366 West Altheimer Drive, Fayetteville, AR 72704
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: driar@uark.edu

Abstract

Research was conducted at experimental research stations near Keiser and Marianna (Marianna-A), AR, in 2007, and in a grower's field near Marianna (Marianna-B), AR, in 2008, to compare herbicide programs, including POST application(s) of glyphosate/glufosinate alone or in combination with residual herbicides applied as PRE, mid-POST (MPOST), or layby POST-directed (PD) in enhanced glyphosate- and glufosinate-resistant cotton. Weed species evaluated included Palmer amaranth, pitted morningglory, hemp sesbania, barnyardgrass, and a mixture of large crabgrass and goosegrass. At Marianna-B, AR, the Palmer amaranth population was a mixture of glyphosate-resistant and -susceptible plants. For both cotton cultivars and at all locations, inclusion of S-metolachlor plus fluometuron PRE increased weed control and/or decreased the number of glufosinate or glyphosate applications needed in-season. At Marianna-B, AR, PRE residual herbicides and/or glufosinate were required to control glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth. Addition of pyrithiobac to glufosinate or glyphosate did not increase weed control. A layby PD application of flumioxazin plus MSMA was required to increase late-season control of all weed species in POST glufosinate-only programs, but not in POST glyphosate-only programs. None of the programs caused > 5% injury to either cotton cultivar. Seed-cotton yield was similar in all herbicide programs at Keiser, AR, and Marianna-A, AR, except for the POST glyphosate-only program, which yielded less than the PRE followed by POST programs in glyphosate-resistant cotton at Keiser, AR. In general, PRE herbicides did not increase cotton yield but did improve early and late-season control of glyphosate-susceptible and -resistant weeds in both cotton cultivars.

En 2007 se realizó una investigación en una estación experimental cerca de Keiser y Marianna (Marianna-A), AR, y en 2008, en un campo de cultivo cerca de Marianna (Marianna-B), AR, para comparar programas de herbicidas que incluyeron aplicaciones POST de glifosato/glufosinato solo o en combinación con herbicidas residuales aplicados como PRE, MPOST o POST-dirigidas (PD) en banda, en algodón mejorado resistente a glifosato y glufosinato. Las especies de maleza evaluadas incluyeron Amaranthus palmeri, Ipomoea lacunosa, Sesbania herbacea, Echinochloa crus-galli y una mezcla de Digitaria sanguinalis y Eleusine indica. En Marianna-B, la población de Amaranthus palmeri fue una mezcla de plantas resistentes y susceptibles a glifosato. Para ambos cultivares de algodón y en todas los sitios, la inclusión de S-metolaclor más fluometuron PRE incrementó el control de la maleza y/o disminuyó el número de aplicaciones de glufosinato o glifosato necesarias en la estación. En Marianna-B, herbicidas residuales PRE y/o glufosinato se requirieron para controlar Amaranthus palmeri resistente a glifosato. La adición de pirithiobac a glufosinato o glifosato no aumentó el control de la maleza. Una aplicación PD en banda de flumioxazina más MSMA se requirió para incrementar, tarde en la estación, el control de todas las especies de maleza en programas de solo glufosinato POST, pero no en programas de únicamente glifosato POST. Ninguno de los programas causó >5% de daño a cada cultivar de algodón. El rendimiento de semillas de algodón fue similar en todos los programas de herbicida en Keiser y Marianna-A, excepto del programa de solo glifosato POST, que rindió menos que los programas PRE seguidos por POST, en algodón resistente a glifosato en Keiser. En general, los herbicidas PRE no incrementaron el rendimiento de algodón, pero temprano y tarde en la estación, si mejoraron el control de maleza susceptible y resistente a glifosato en ambos cultivares de algodón.

Type
Weed Management—Major Crops
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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Herbicide Programs for Enhanced Glyphosate-Resistant and Glufosinate-Resistant Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)
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