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Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) Use by Cattle Grazing on Irrigated Pasture

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Peter Bergen
Affiliation:
Alberta Sugar Co., Box 1209, Taber, AB, TOK 2GO, Canada
James R. Moyer
Affiliation:
Alberta Sugar Co., Box 1209, Taber, AB, TOK 2GO, Canada
Gerald C. Kozub
Affiliation:
Res. Stn., Agric. Canada, Lethbridge, AB, T1J 4B1, Canada

Abstract

Hereford cows and their spring-born calves grazed an irrigated grass pasture containing about 13% dandelion based on dry weight yield. Grazing treatments were 1) no grazing, 2) 4 days of grazing just before clipping, and 3) long-term grazing just before clipping. In clippings taken in June and July after the grazing treatments, the percentage dandelion in the forage was similar in all three grazing treatments, indicating that cattle used dandelion as readily as grass. The protein and mineral contents of dandelion were at appropriate levels to meet the established requirements of beef cattle.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 Weed Science Society of America 

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