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Broomsedge (Andropogon virginicus) Response to Herbicides and Burning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Twain J. Butler*
Affiliation:
Texas A&M University Research & Extension Center, 1229 N. HW 281 Stephenville, TX 76401
Jim F. Stritzke
Affiliation:
277 Agriculture Hall, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078
Larry A. Redmon
Affiliation:
Texas A&M Research & Extension Center, 1710 N. HW 3053, P.O. Box 200, Overton, TX 75684
Carla L. Goad
Affiliation:
301 Mathematic Sciences, Department of Statistics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: t-butler@tamu.edu.

Abstract

Broomsedge control studies were conducted on six broomsedge-infested pastures in southeastern Oklahoma from 1995 to 1997. Glyphosate applied in spring at 2.24 kg ai/ha decreased broomsedge plant density by 58% 3 mo after treatment (MAT), on areas where the previous year's forage was grazed, and by 95% 3 MAT, where spring fire had removed the old top-growth before glyphosate application. Broomsedge plant density was not affected where glyphosate was applied in spring to sites with old-standing top-growth. Paraquat applied in spring at 0.56 kg ai/ha and spring burning without a herbicide treatment had no effect on broomsedge plant density. Glyphosate at 0.56 and 1.12 kg ai/ha applied in late summer reduced the number of broomsedge stems 1 yr after treatment (YAT) by an average of 65 and 80%, respectively. Paraquat at 0.56 kg/ha applied in late summer of 1995, followed by burning 1 wk after treatment (WAT), decreased broomsedge stem density by more than 60% 1 YAT at four of six locations when compared with mowing in late summer. Burning in November after an October frost decreased broomsedge stem density by more than 47% 1 YAT at four locations. Two consecutive years of burning after frost and paraquat applied in late summer followed by burning 1 WAT reduced broomsedge dry matter production by 68 and 96%, respectively, when compared with mowing in late summer. These data suggest that good to excellent control of established broomsedge is possible with herbicides alone, with a combination of herbicides and late-summer burning, and with fall burning after an early frost in a dry fall. However, broomsedge control was short-lived with all the treatments because of the establishment of new broomsedge seedlings. Thus, it will be important to integrate the destruction of broomsedge plants with proper fertility and grazing management in order to provide satisfactory broomsedge control.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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