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Biologically Effective Dose and Selectivity of RPA 201772 for Preemergence Weed Control in Corn (Zea mays)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Stevan Z. Knezevic
Affiliation:
Crop Science Division, Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada NIG 2W1
Peter H. Sikkema
Affiliation:
Ridgetown College, University of Guelph, Ridgetown, Ontario. Canada NOP 2C0
Francois Tardif
Affiliation:
Crop Science Division, Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada NIG 2W1
Allan S. Hamill
Affiliation:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Harrow, Ontario. Canada NOR 1G0
Kevin Chandler
Affiliation:
Crop Science Division, Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada NIG 2W1
Clarence J. Swanton
Affiliation:
Crop Science Division, Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada NIG 2W1

Abstract

Field studies were conducted in 1996 and 1997 at three locations throughout southern Ontario with the objective of developing dose-response curves of RPA 201772 for weed control and crop tolerance in corn. The biologically effective doses required to control redroot pigweed, velvetleaf, and wild mustard were 100, 90, and 80 g/ha, respectively. Yellow foxtail was controlled with 100 to 120 g/ha, while rates for common lambsquarters varied from 60 to 130 g/ha, depending on the year and location. Wild buckwheat control was poor (> 30%) at all of the doses tested. RPA 201772 did not reduce corn grain yield; however, temporary crop injury was evident on coarse sandy soils.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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