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Bentazon Spray Retention, Activity, and Foliar Washoff in Weed Species

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Krishna N. Reddy
Affiliation:
South. Weed Sci. Lab., and Agric. Eng., Appl. and Prod. Tech. Res. Unit, USDA ARS, Stoneville, MS 38776
Martin A. Locke
Affiliation:
South. Weed Sci. Lab., and Agric. Eng., Appl. and Prod. Tech. Res. Unit, USDA ARS, Stoneville, MS 38776
Kevin D. Howard
Affiliation:
South. Weed Sci. Lab., and Agric. Eng., Appl. and Prod. Tech. Res. Unit, USDA ARS, Stoneville, MS 38776

Abstract

Greenhouse studies were conducted to investigate the effects of adjuvant and rainfall on bentazon spray retention, efficacy, and foliar washoff in hemp sesbania, sicklepod, smooth pigweed, and velvetleaf. Bentazon was applied at 0.28 to 2.24 kg ai/ha with Agri-Dex, a crop oil concentrate (COC) or Kinetic, an organiosilicone-nonionic surfactant blend (OSB) when weeds were at the three- to five-leaf stage. Plants were subjected to 2.5 cm simulated rainfall for 20 min at 1 and 24 h after application of bentazon. Shoot fresh weight reduction assessed 2 wk after treatment was similar with either adjuvant on velvetleaf and smooth pigweed. OSB enhanced bentazon efficacy in hemp sesbania and sicklepod as compared to COC. Rainfall at 1 h after application generally reduced bentazon activity in all weeds. OSB maintained bentazon activity in hemp sesbania when subjected to rainfall at 1 h after application as compared to COC. Overall, bentazon spray retention on plants was 9 to 550% higher with OSB as compared to COC among the species at 1 h after application. Amount of bentazon residue washed off from the foliage by rainfall within a weed species was relatively similar for both adjuvants except in smooth pigweed and ranged from 39 to 98% among the four weed species at 1 h after application. OSB exhibited specificity for certain weed species and the potential to minimize bentazon spray reaching the soil by increasing deposition.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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