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Article contents

Herbicide Absorption and Translocation in Plants using Radioisotopes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Vijay K. Nandula
Affiliation:
Crop Production Systems Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Stoneville, MS 38776
William K. Vencill
Affiliation:
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Corresponding
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Extract

2,4-D, discovered independently in the United States and Europe in the mid-1940s, was one of the first synthetic herbicides to be used selectively for weed control (Cobb and Reade 2010). Since then, several herbicides belonging to different chemical classes and possessing diverse mechanisms of action have been synthesized and marketed globally. Herbicides have vastly contributed to increasing world food, fiber, fuel, and feed production in an efficient, economic, and environmentally sustainable manner. Before receiving regulatory approval, all herbicides (pesticides) undergo rigorous testing for their toxicological, residual, physicochemical, and biological properties. Additionally, herbicides are suitably formulated to reach their target site and maximize their efficacy on target weeds while being safe on crops.

Type
Weed Biology and Ecology
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America

References

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