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Target-Site Point Mutation Conferring Resistance to Trifluralin in Rigid Ryegrass (Lolium rigidum)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 October 2017

Benjamin Fleet
Affiliation:
Post-graduate Student, Post-doctoral fellow, Associate Professor, and Associate Professor, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, South Australia, 5064
Jenna Malone
Affiliation:
Post-graduate Student, Post-doctoral fellow, Associate Professor, and Associate Professor, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, South Australia, 5064
Christopher Preston
Affiliation:
Post-graduate Student, Post-doctoral fellow, Associate Professor, and Associate Professor, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, South Australia, 5064
Gurjeet Gill
Affiliation:
Post-graduate Student, Post-doctoral fellow, Associate Professor, and Associate Professor, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, South Australia, 5064
Corresponding

Abstract

Populations of rigid ryegrass suspected of resistance to trifluralin due to control failures exhibited varying levels of susceptibility to trifluralin, with 15 out of 17 populations deemed resistant (>20% plant survival). Detailed dose–response studies were conducted on one highly resistant field-evolved population (SLR74), one known multiply resistant population (SLR31), and one susceptible population (VLR1). On the basis of the dose required to kill 50% of treated plants (LD50), SLR74 had 15-fold greater resistance than VLR1, whereas, the multiply resistant SLR31 had 10-fold greater resistance than VLR1. Similarly, on the basis of dose required to reduce shoot biomass by 50% (GR50), SLR74 had 17-fold greater resistance than VLR1, and SLR31 had 8-fold greater resistance than VLR1. Sequencing of the α-tubulin gene from resistant plants of different populations confirmed the presence of a previously known goosegrass mutation causing an amino acid substitution at position 239 from threonine to isoleucine in resistant population SLR74. This mutation was also found in 4 out of 5 individuals in another highly resistant population TR2 and in 3 out of 5 individuals of TR4. An amino acid substitution from valine to phenylalanine at position 202 was also observed in TR4 (3 out of 5 plants) and TR2 (1 out of 5 plants). There was no target-site mutation identified in SLR31. This study documents the first known case of field-evolved target-site resistance to dinitroaniline herbicides in a population of rigid ryegrass.

Type
Weed Management
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2017 

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Footnotes

Associate Editor for This Paper: Franck E. Dayan, Colorado State University.

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