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Resistance to bixlozone and clomazone in cross-resistant rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) populations from southern Australia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 January 2021

David J. Brunton
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Student, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, South Australia, Australia
Gurjeet Gill
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, South Australia, Australia
Christopher Preston
Affiliation:
Professor, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, South Australia, Australia
Corresponding

Abstract

Three resistant (R) rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum Gaudin) populations from southern Australia (EP162, 375-14, and 198-15) with cross-resistance to thiocarbamate, chloroacetamide, and sulfonylisoxazoline herbicides displayed reduced sensitivity to the isoxazolidinone herbicides bixlozone and clomazone. Each of these R populations was exposed to two cycles of recurrent selection (RS) in which plants were treated with the field rate of bixlozone, survivors were bulk crossed, and seed was collected. After the first cycle of recurrent selection (RS1), the LD50 to bixlozone in population 198-15 increased to 17.5-fold compared with the S population and increased further to 26.9-fold after a second cycle of recurrent selection (RS2). The recurrent selection process also increased the level of resistance to bixlozone in populations EP162 and 375-14 (7.8- to 18.4-fold) compared with the S population. Phorate antagonized bixlozone and clomazone in SLR4 (34.6- and 28.1-fold increase in LD50) and both herbicides in populations EP162 (36.5- to 46.6-fold), 375-14 (71.4- to 73.9-fold), and 198-15 (86.4- to 91.5-fold) compared with the absence of phorate. The increase in LD50 of all L. rigidum RS populations when treated with phorate suggests a lack of herbicide activation is not the likely resistance mechanism to these herbicides. This research highlights the elevated risk of thiocarbamate-resistant L. rigidum populations to rapidly evolve resistance to the isoxazolidinone herbicides bixlozone and clomazone.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2021

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Mithila Jugulam, Kansas State University

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Resistance to bixlozone and clomazone in cross-resistant rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) populations from southern Australia
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