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Herbicide Effects on Ivyleaf Morningglory (Ipomoea hederacea) and Soybean (Glycine max) Growth and Water Relations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

James C. Holloway Jr.
Affiliation:
Dep. Plant and Soil Sci., Box 9555, Miss. State Univ., Mississippi State, MS 39762
David R. Shaw
Affiliation:
Dep. Plant and Soil Sci., Box 9555, Miss. State Univ., Mississippi State, MS 39762

Abstract

Soybean and ivyleaf morningglory were grown alone and together to quantify water use and growth after treatment with soil-applied chlorimuron plus metribuzin, imazaquin, or no herbicide. Soybean water consumption was 22 ml pot−1 day−1 or more when grown alone or with another soybean, regardless of herbicide treatment. Ivyleaf morningglory grown alone or with another ivyleaf morningglory consumed ≥ 32 ml water pot−1 day−1 when no herbicide was applied. Treatment with chlorimuron plus metribuzin or imazaquin reduced ivyleaf morningglory water consumption to ≤ 4 ml pot−1 day−1. Water use was reduced with either herbicide when soybean and ivyleaf morningglory were grown together, indicating little or no water consumption by ivyleaf morningglory. Ivyleaf morningglory height, root length, leaf area, and dry matter were reduced by imazaquin or chlorimuron plus metribuzin. Soybean leaf area was also reduced by herbicide treatment or the presence of another plant. Soybean biomass was not reduced in any planting combination, except when two soybean were grown together and treated with imazaquin. Nontreated ivyleaf morningglory partitioned more biomass into the shoots than roots. Ivyleaf morningglory responded to herbicide treatment by partitioning more biomass into roots.

Type
Weed Biology and Ecology
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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Footnotes

Approved for publication as Journal Article No. J-8699 of the Miss. Agric. For. Exp. Sta., Mississippi State Univ. This research was a part of state project MIS 2357, and was funded by the Mississippi Soybean Promotion Board. Research conducted in partial fulfillment of requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Weed Science at Mississippi State Univ.

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Herbicide Effects on Ivyleaf Morningglory (Ipomoea hederacea) and Soybean (Glycine max) Growth and Water Relations
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