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Functional Genomics Analysis of Horseweed (Conyza canadensis) with Special Reference to the Evolution of Non–Target-Site Glyphosate Resistance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Joshua S. Yuan
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Institute of Plant Genomics and Microbiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843
Laura L. G. Abercrombie
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996
Yongwei Cao
Affiliation:
Monsanto Company, Saint Louis, MO 63167
Matthew D. Halfhill
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 Department of Biology, St. Ambrose University, Davenport, IA 52803
Xin Zhou
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Institute of Plant Genomics and Microbiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843
Yanhui Peng
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996
Jun Hu
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Institute of Plant Genomics and Microbiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996
Murali R. Rao
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996
Gregory R. Heck
Affiliation:
Monsanto Company, Saint Louis, MO 63167
Thomas J. Larosa
Affiliation:
Monsanto Company, Saint Louis, MO 63167
R. Douglas Sammons
Affiliation:
Monsanto Company, Saint Louis, MO 63167
Xinwang Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996
Priya Ranjan
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 Environmental Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN
Denita H. Johnson
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996
Phillip A. Wadl
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996
Brian E. Scheffler
Affiliation:
U.S. Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service–Gemonics and Bioinformatics Research Unit; Mid-South Area, Genomics Laboratory, 141 Experiment Station Rd., Stoneville, MS 38776
Timothy A. Rinehart
Affiliation:
U.S. Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service Southern Horticultural Laboratory, 810 Highway 26 West, Poplarville, MS 39470
Robert N. Trigiano
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996
C. Neal Stewart Jr.*
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: nealstewart@utk.edu

Abstract

The evolution of glyphosate resistance in weedy species places an environmentally benign herbicide in peril. The first report of a dicot plant with evolved glyphosate resistance was horseweed, which occurred in 2001. Since then, several species have evolved glyphosate resistance and genomic information about nontarget resistance mechanisms in any of them ranges from none to little. Here, we report a study combining iGentifier transcriptome analysis, cDNA sequencing, and a heterologous microarray analysis to explore potential molecular and transcriptomic mechanisms of nontarget glyphosate resistance of horseweed. The results indicate that similar molecular mechanisms might exist for nontarget herbicide resistance across multiple resistant plants from different locations, even though resistance among these resistant plants likely evolved independently and available evidence suggests resistance has evolved at least four separate times. In addition, both the microarray and sequence analyses identified non–target-site resistance candidate genes for follow-on functional genomics analysis.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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Functional Genomics Analysis of Horseweed (Conyza canadensis) with Special Reference to the Evolution of Non–Target-Site Glyphosate Resistance
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