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Effect of ridge truncation on weed populations and control in ridge-tillage corn (Zea mays)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Douglas D. Buhler*
Affiliation:
National Soil Tilth Laboratory, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, 2150 Pammel Drive, Ames, IA 50011; buhler@nstl.gov

Abstract

Ridge truncation methods affected weed populations, weed control, and corn yields in a ridge-tillage production system. Ridges were left undisturbed, partially truncated, deeply truncated, or destroyed by full-width tillage. The effect of truncation on weed densities and control (visual estimates of biomass reduction) varied by weed species, herbicide treatment, and time of observation. Without herbicide, deep truncation resulted in the lowest densities of all species except giant foxtail. Band application of herbicide controlled all weed species as well as broadcast application following deep truncation. When herbicides were broadcast, weed control was usually not affected by ridge truncation. Ridge truncation often increased corn yields compared with no truncation due to better weed control. While deep truncation often resulted in lower weed populations following herbicide treatment than shallow truncation or disking, differences were not great enough to affect corn yields. When ridges were truncated, broadcast herbicide did not increase corn yields compared with banded herbicide.

Type
Weed Management
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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