Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-65dc7cd545-spssh Total loading time: 0.25 Render date: 2021-07-25T01:13:11.220Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Absorption, Translocation, and Metabolism of Amicarbazone in Annual Bluegrass (Poa annua), Creeping Bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), and Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Jialin Yu
Affiliation:
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223-1797
Patrick E. McCullough
Affiliation:
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223-1797
William K. Vencill
Affiliation:
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223-1797
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Amicarbazone controls annual bluegrass in cool-season turfgrasses but physiological effects that influence selectivity have received limited investigation. The objective of this research was to evaluate uptake, translocation, and metabolism of amicarbazone in these species. Annual bluegrass, creeping bentgrass, and tall fescue required < 3, 56, and 35 h to reach 50% foliar absorption, respectively. At 72 h after treatment (HAT), annual bluegrass and creeping bentgrass translocated 73 and 70% of root-absorbed 14C to shoots, respectively, while tall fescue only distributed 55%. Annual bluegrass recovered ≈ 50% more root-absorbed 14C in shoots than creeping bentgrass and tall fescue. Creeping bentgrass and tall fescue metabolism of amicarbazone was ≈ 2-fold greater than annual bluegrass from 1 to 7 d after treatment (DAT). Results suggest greater absorption, more distribution, and less metabolism of amicarbazone in annual bluegrass, compared to creeping bentgrass and tall fescue, could be attributed to selectivity of POST applications.

Type
Physiology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Anonymous. 2012. Xonerate herbicide label. Arysta LifeScience, 15401 Weston Parkway Suite 150, Cary, NC 27513. 32 p.Google Scholar
Beard, J. B. 1970. An ecological study of annual bluegrass. USGA Green Sect. Rec. 8: 1318.Google Scholar
Callahan, L. M. and McDonald, E. R. 1992. Effectiveness of bensulide in controlling two annual bluegrass (Poa annua) subspecies. Weed Technol. 6: 97103.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chachalis, D., Reddy, K. N., and Elmore, C. D. 2001. Herbicide efficacy, leaf structure, and spray droplet contact angle among Ipomoea species and smallflower morningglory. Weed Sci. 49: 628634.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dayan, F. E., Trindale, M. L., and Velini, E. D. 2009. Amicarbazone, a new photosystem II inhibitor. Weed Sci. 57: 579583.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hess, F. D. 1985. Herbicide absorption and translocation and their relationship to plant tolerances and susceptibility. Pages 191214 in Duke, S. O., ed. Weed Physiology. Volume II. Herbicide Physiology. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.Google Scholar
Hoagland, D. R. and Arnon, D. I. 1950. The water-culture method for growing plants without Soil. Berkeley, CA: California Agricultural Experiment Station Cir. No. 347. 29 p.Google Scholar
Jones, M. A. and Christians, N. E. 2007. Mesotrione controls creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) in Kentucky bluegrass. Weed Technol. 21: 402405.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Juska, F. V. and Hanson, A. A. 1967. Factors affecting Poa annua L. control. Weeds 15: 98102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kalnay, P. A. and Glenn, S. S. 2000. Translocation of nicosulfuron and dicamba in hemp dogbane (Apocynum cannabinum). Weed Technol. 14: 476479.Google Scholar
Lush, W. M. 1989. Adaptation and differentiation of golf course populations of annual bluegrass. Weed Sci. 37: 5459.Google Scholar
Lycan, D. W. and Hart, S. E. 2004. Relative tolerance of four cool-season turfgrass species to sulfosulfuron. Weed Technol. 18: 977981.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lycan, D. W. and Hart, S. E. 2006. Seasonal effects on annual bluegrass control in creeping bentgrass with bispyribac-sodium. Weed Technol. 20: 722727.Google Scholar
Lycan, D. W., Hart, S. E., and Murphy, J. A. 2005. Annual bluegrass (Poa annua) control in Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) with sulfosulfuron. Int. Turf. Soc. Res. J. 10: 12221226.Google Scholar
McCullough, P. E., Hart, S. E., Gianfagna, T. J., and Chaves, F. C. 2009. Bispyribac-sodium metabolism in annual bluegrass, creeping bentgrass, and perennial ryegrass. Weed Sci. 57: 470473.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCullough, P. E., Hart, S. E., Weisenberger, D., and Reicher, Z. J. 2010. Amicarbazone efficacy on annual bluegrass and safety on cool-season turfgrasses. Weed Technol. 24: 461470.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meyer, J. W. and Branham, B. E. 2006. Response of four turfgrass species to ethofumesate. Weed Technol. 20: 123129.Google Scholar
Olson, B. L., Al-Khatib, K., Stahlman, P., and Isakson, P. J. 2000. Efficacy and metabolism of MON 37500 in Triticum aestivum and weedy grass species as affected by temperature and soil moisture. Weed Sci. 48: 541548.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Perry, D. H., McElroy, J. S., and Walker, R. H. 2011. Effects of soil vs. foliar application of amicarbazone on annual bluegrass (Poa annua). Weed Technol. 25: 604608.Google Scholar
Pester, T. A., Westra, P., Anderson, R. L., Lyon, D. J., Miller, S. D., Stahlman, P. W., Northam, F. E., and Wicks, G. A. 2000. Secale cereale interference and economic thresholds in winter Triticum aestivum . Weed Sci. 48: 720727.Google Scholar
Philbrook, B. D., Kremer, M., Mueller, K. H., and Deege, R. 1999. BAY MKH 3586—a new herbicide for broad spectrum weed control in corn (maize) and sugarcane. Pages 2934 in Proceedings of the Brighton Crop Protection Conference on Weeds. Alton, Hampshire, UK: British Crop Production Council.Google Scholar
Sanyal, D., Bhowmik, P. C., and Reddy, K. D. 2006. Influence of leaf surface micromorphology, wax content, and surfactant on primisulfuron droplet spread on barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli) and green foxtail (Setaria viridis). Weed Sci. 54: 627633.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Seeruttun, S., Barbe, C., and Gaungoo, A. 2008. New herbicide tank-mix, Krismat + Dinamic: a cost-effective broad-spectrum pre- and post-emergence treatment for managing weeds in sugarcane. Sugar Cane Internat. 26: 1821.Google Scholar
Senseman, S. A. 2007. Herbicide Handbook. Lawrence, KS: Weed Science Society of America. 31 p.Google Scholar
Sprague, H. B. and Burton, G. W. 1937. Annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.), and its requirements for growth. New Brunswick, NJ: New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin 630. 458 p.Google Scholar
Wanamarta, G. and Penner, D. 1989. Foliar absorption of herbicides. Rev. Weed Sci. 4: 215231.Google Scholar
15
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Absorption, Translocation, and Metabolism of Amicarbazone in Annual Bluegrass (Poa annua), Creeping Bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), and Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea)
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Absorption, Translocation, and Metabolism of Amicarbazone in Annual Bluegrass (Poa annua), Creeping Bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), and Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea)
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Absorption, Translocation, and Metabolism of Amicarbazone in Annual Bluegrass (Poa annua), Creeping Bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), and Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *