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Multi-microelectrode investigation of monkey striate cortex: Link between correlational and neuronal properties in the infragranular layers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 June 2009

J. Krüger
Affiliation:
Neurologische Universitätsklinik, Hansastrasse 9, D 7800 Freiburg, Federal Republic of Germany

Abstract

Recordings were taken from infragranular layers of area 17 of anesthetized monkeys with an array of 30 microelectrodes matching about one hypercolumn. From intracortical spike-train correlations, the novel neuronal property “delay scale position” related to retino-cortical delays, was derived. Relationships were established to the degree of spike isolation and to classical response properties. Direction selectivity, spike rate, spike-isolation quality, delay scale, and color selectivity could be linked to an underlying factor upon which the latter variables depend in a fixed way. Neurons with similar factors were characterized by non-delayed correlations. The link was more strict in layer VI than in layer V, and it was related to the parvo/magnocellular subdivision of the visual system.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1990

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Multi-microelectrode investigation of monkey striate cortex: Link between correlational and neuronal properties in the infragranular layers
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