Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78bd46657c-2pqp7 Total loading time: 0.297 Render date: 2021-05-09T02:08:00.328Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Does early enucleation affect the decussation pattern of alpha cells in the ferret?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 June 2009

Benjamin E. Reese
Affiliation:
Neuroscience Research Institute and Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara
Janal L. Urich
Affiliation:
Neuroscience Research Institute and Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara

Abstract

Naturally occurring cell death has been hypothesized to sculpt various features of the organization of the mature visual pathways, including the recent proposal that the selective elimination of ganglion cells in the temporal retina shapes the formation of decussation patterns. Through a class-specific interocular competition, ganglion cells in the two temporal hemiretinae are selectively lost to produce the decussation patterns characteristic of each individual cell class (Leventhal et al., 1988). The present study has tested this hypothesis by asking whether the removal of one retina in newborn ferrets, which should disrupt binocular interactions at the level of the terminals, alters the decussation pattern of the alpha cells, a cell class that is entirely decussating in the normal adult ferret. Enucleation on the day of birth was found to increase the uncrossed projection by ≈50%, but not a single uncrossed alpha cell was found in the temporal retina. Either alpha cells never project ipsilaterally during development, or if they do, they cannot be rescued by early enucleation. While naturally occurring cell death plays many roles during development, creating the decussation pattern of the ferreth's alpha cell class via a binocular competition at the level of the targets is unlikely to be one of them.

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Baker, G.E. (1990). Prechiasmatic reordering of fibre diameter classes in the retinofugal pathway of ferrets. European Journal of Neuroscience 2, 2433.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baker, G.E. & Reese, B.E. (1993). Chiasmatic course of temporal retinal axons in the developing ferret. Journal of Comparative Neurology 330, 95104.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baker, G.E. & Stryker, M.P. (1991). Absence of a rapidly-conducting component from the ipsilateral retinofugal pathway of ferrets. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts 17, 111.Google Scholar
Chalupa, L.M. & Lia, B. (1991). The nasotemporal division of retinal ganglion cells with crossed and uncrossed projections in the fetal rhesus monkey. Journal of Neuroscience 11, 191202.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chan, S.-O. & Jen, L.S. (1988). Enlargement of uncrossed retinal projections in the albino rat: Additive effects of neonatal eye removal and thalamectomy. Brain Research 461, 163168.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cowan, W.M., Fawcett, J.W., O'Leary, D.D.M. & Stanfield, B.B. (1984). Regressive events in neurogenesis. Science 225, 12581265.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cucchiaro, J. & Guillery, R.W. (1984). The development of the retinogeniculate pathways in normal and albino ferrets. Proceedings of the Royal Society B (London) 223, 141164.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cucchiaro, J.B. (1991). Early development of the retinal line of decussation in normal and albino ferrets. Journal of Comparative Neurology 312, 193206,CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dreher, B. & Robinson, S.R. (1988). Development of the retinofugal pathway in birds and mammals: Evidence for a common timetable. Brain, Behavior, and Evolution 31, 369390.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Finlay, B.L. & Pallas, S.L. (1989). Control of cell number in the developing mammalian visual system. Progress in Neurobiology 32, 207234.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Godement, P., Salaun, J. & Metin, C. (1987). Fate of uncrossed retinal projections following early or late prenatal monocular enucleation in the mouse. Journal of Comparative Neurology 225, 97109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hanker, J.S., Yates, P.E., Metz, C.B. & Rustioni, A.J. (1977). A new, specific, and non-carcinogenic reagent for the demonstration of horseradish peroxidase. Histochemistry Journal 9, 789792.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Henderson, Z., Finlay, B.L. & Wikler, K.C. (1988). Development of ganglion cell topography in ferret retina. Journal of Neuroscience 8, 11941205.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hsiao, K. (1984). Bilateral branching contributes minimally to the enhanced ipsilateral projection in monocular Syrian golden hamsters. Journal of Neuroscience 4, 368373.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Insausti, R., Blakemore, C. & Cowan, W.M. (1984). Ganglion cell death during development of ipsilateral retino-collicular projection in golden hamster. Nature 308, 362364.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jeffery, G. (1984). Retinal ganglion cell death and terminal field retraction in the developing rodent visual system. Developmental Brain Research 13, 8197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jeffery, G. & Perry, V.H. (1982). Evidence for ganglion cell death during development of the ipsilateral retinal projection in the rat. Developmental Brain Research 2, 176180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kirby, M.A. & Chalupa, L.M. (1986). Retinal crowding alters the morphology of alpha ganglion cells. Journal of Comparative Neurology 251, 532541.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Leventhal, A.G., Schall, J.D., Ault, S.J., Provis, J.M. & Vitek, D.J. (1988). Class-specific cell death shapes the distribution and pattern of central projection of cat retinal ganglion cells. Journal of Neuroscience 8, 20112027.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Linden, D.C., Guillery, R.W. & Cucchiaro, J. (1981). The dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the normal ferret and its postnatal development. Journal of Comparative Neurology 203, 189211.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Linden, R. & Perry, V.H. (1982). Ganglion cell death within the developing retina: A regulatory role for retinal dendrites? Neuroscience 7, 28132837.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Linden, R. & Serfaty, C.A. (1985). Evidence for differential effects of terminal and dendritic competition upon developmental neuronal death in the retina. Neuroscience 15, 853868.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ng, A.Y.K. & Stone, J. (1982). The optic nerve of the cat: Appearance and loss of axons during normal development. Developmental Brian Research 5, 263271.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Provis, J.M. & Penfold, P.L. (1988). Cell death and the elimination of retinal axons during development. Progress in Neurobiology 31, 331347.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ramoa, A.S., Campbell, G. & Shatz, C.J. (1988). Dendritic growth and remodeling of cat retinal ganglion cells during fetal and postnatal development. Journal of Neuroscience 8, 42394261.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reese, B.E. & Baker, G.E. (1990). The course of fibre diameter classes through the chiasmatic region in the ferret. European Journal of Neuroscience 2, 3449.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reese, B.E. & Cowey, A. (1986). Large retinal ganglion cells in the rat: Their distribution and laterality of projection. Experimental Brain Research 61, 375385.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reese, B.E., Guillery, R.W. & Mallarino, C. (1992). Time of ganglion cell genesis in relation to the chiasmatic pathway choice of retinofugal axons. Journal of Comparative Neurology 324, 336342.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reese, B.E., Guillery, R.W., Marzi, C.A. & Tassinari, G. (1991). Position of axons in the cat's optic tract in relation to their retinal origin and chiasmatic pathway. Journal of Comparative Neurology 306, 539553.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reese, B.E., Thompson, W.F. & Peduzzi, J.D. (1994). Birthdates of neurons in the retinal ganglion cell layer of the ferret. Journal of Comparative Neurology 341, 464475.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Robinson, S.R. (1991). Development of the mammalian retina. In Neuroanatomy of the Visual Pathways and Their Development, ed. Dreher, B. & Robinson, S.R., pp. 69128. London: Macmillan.Google Scholar
Thompson, I.D. & Morgan, J.E. (1993). The development of retinal ganglion cell decussation patterns in postnatal pigmented and albino ferrets. European Journal of Neuroscience 5, 341356.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thompson, I.D., Morgan, J.E. & Henderson, Z. (1993). The effects of monocular enucleation on ganglion cell number and terminal distribution in the ferret's retinal pathway. European Journal of Neuroscience 5, 357367.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vitek, D.J., Schall, J.D. & Leventhal, A.G. (1985). Morphology, central projections, and dendritic field orientation of retinal ganglion cells in the ferret. Journal of Comparative Neurology 241, 111.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Walsh, C. & Polley, E.H. (1985). The topography of ganglion cell production in the cat's retina. Journal of Neuroscience 5, 741750.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Walsh, C, Polley, E.H., Hickey, T.L. & Guillery, R.W. (1983). Generation of cat retinal ganglion cells in relation to central pathways. Nature 302, 611614.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Williams, R.W., Bastiani, M.J., Lia, B. & Chalupa, L.M. (1986). Growth cones, dying axons, and developmental fluctuations in the fiber populations of the cat's optic nerve. Journal of Comparative Neurology 246, 3269.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wingate, R.J.T., FitzGibbon, T. & Thompson, I.D. (1992). Lucifer yellow, retrograde tracers, and fractal analysis characterise adult ferret retinal ganglion cells. Journal of Comparative Neurology 323, 449474.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Does early enucleation affect the decussation pattern of alpha cells in the ferret?
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Does early enucleation affect the decussation pattern of alpha cells in the ferret?
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Does early enucleation affect the decussation pattern of alpha cells in the ferret?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *