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Distribution of tubulin, kinesin, and dynein in light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2000

JUANA M. MARTINEZ
Affiliation:
Biology Department, California State University, Dominguez Hills, Carson
HASSAN ELFARISSI
Affiliation:
Biology Department, California State University, Dominguez Hills, Carson
BEGONA De VELASCO
Affiliation:
Biology Department, California State University, Dominguez Hills, Carson
GINA H. OCHOA
Affiliation:
Biology Department, California State University, Dominguez Hills, Carson
ARIA M. MILLER
Affiliation:
Biology Department, California State University, Dominguez Hills, Carson
YING MEI CLARK
Affiliation:
Biology Department, California State University, Dominguez Hills, Carson
BRIAN MATSUMOTO
Affiliation:
Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara
LAURA J. ROBLES
Affiliation:
Biology Department, California State University, Dominguez Hills, Carson

Abstract

Cephalopod retinas exhibit several responses to light and dark adaptation, including rhabdom size changes, photopigment movements, and pigment granule migration. Light- and dark-directed rearrangements of microfilament and microtubule cytoskeletal transport pathways could drive these changes. Recently, we localized actin-binding proteins in light-/dark-adapted octopus rhabdoms and suggested that actin cytoskeletal rearrangements bring about the formation and degradation of rhabdomere microvilli subsets. To determine if the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins control the other light/dark changes, we used immunoblotting and immunocytochemical procedures to map the distribution of tubulin, kinesin, and dynein in dorsal and ventral halves of light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas. Immunoblots detected α- and β-tubulin, dynein intermediate chain, and kinesin heavy chain in extracts of whole retinas. Epifluorescence and confocal microscopy showed that the tubulin proteins were distributed throughout the retina with more immunoreactivity in retinas exposed to light. Kinesin localization was heavy in the pigment layer of light- and dark-adapted ventral retinas but was less prominent in the dorsal region. Dynein distribution also varied in dorsal and ventral retinas with more immunoreactivity in light- and dark-adapted ventral retinas and confocal microscopy emphasized the granular nature of this labeling. We suggest that light may regulate the distribution of microtubule cytoskeletal proteins in the octopus retina and that position, dorsal versus ventral, also influences the distribution of motor proteins. The microtubule cytoskeleton is most likely involved in pigment granule migration in the light and dark and with the movement of transport vesicles from the photoreceptor inner segments to the rhabdoms.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2000 Cambridge University Press

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