Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-rcd7l Total loading time: 0.265 Render date: 2021-10-25T05:40:29.999Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Representativeness of a roster of volunteer North American twins with chronic disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2012

Thomas M Mack*
Affiliation:
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA.
Dennis Deapen
Affiliation:
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA.
Ann S Hamilton
Affiliation:
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA.
*
*Correspondence: Dr TM Mack, Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California School of Medicine, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, MS No 44, Box 33800, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

To identify large numbers of twins affected by chronic disease as potential subjects for studies of environmental and genetic chronic disease determinants, we advertised for affected twins over the period 1980–91 in newspapers across North America. Responses were received from 17 245 twin pairs in which cases of cancer or other chronic disease had occurred. To assess the representativeness of affected twins identified by advertising, we evaluated the pattern of reporting, compared the cases identified to the number of cases estimated to be prevalent among all North American twins, compared the cases to population-based singleton case series, compared the healthy co-twins to population-based samples of healthy persons, assessed the impact on ascertainment of opinions about disease causation, compared the pattern of prospective to retrospective ascertainment of disease in the originally unaffected co-twins of cases, and compared the results of the prospective ascertainment of disease in co-twins to comparable published estimates. Youth, gender, zygosity, education, and disease concordance were found to be overall determinants of ascertainment. Disease-discordant DZ twins appeared to be modestly underascertained. While somewhat better educated, both concordant and discordant pairs were judged to be reasonably representative of affected non-Hispanic white North American twin pairs of comparable status, ie of comparable age, sex, race, and zygosity. If interpreted with caution, the concordance patterns of such twins can be used to generate genetic hypotheses, but should not be the basis of definitive heritability analyses. We conclude that advertising offers a method of identifying pairs of twins that can serve as subjects for studies designed to identify disease determinants. Twin Research (2000) 3, 33–42.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2000
You have Access
7
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Representativeness of a roster of volunteer North American twins with chronic disease
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Representativeness of a roster of volunteer North American twins with chronic disease
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Representativeness of a roster of volunteer North American twins with chronic disease
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *