Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-h5t46 Total loading time: 0.265 Render date: 2022-06-26T00:26:18.810Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

The Potential Usefulness of Free Fetal DNA in Maternal Blood for Prenatal Fetal Gender Determination in Multiple Pregnancies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2012

Elena Picchiassi*
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Gian Carlo Di Renzo
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Federica Tarquini
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Vittorio Bini
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Michela Centra
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Luana Pennacchi
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Fabiana Galeone
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Giuliana Coata
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
*
Address For Correspondence: Elena Picchiassi, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital, 06132 S. Andrea delle Fratte, Perugia, Italy. E-mail: CMPR-LAB@unipg.it; elena_picchi@libero.it

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

We applied a noninvasive prenatal test for the determination of fetal gender in multiple pregnancies by using free fetal DNA circulating in maternal blood in order to evaluate whether the quantification of male DNA could distinguish the fetal gender and the number of male and female fetuses in multiple pregnancies. We enrolled consecutively 44 women with twin pregnancies between 11–14 weeks of gestation. Peripheral maternal blood was collected, and genomic DNA was extracted from maternal plasma and analyzed for the multicopy DYS 14 sequence by using real-time PCR to quantify male DNA. Results showed that male DNA concentration was significantly higher in twin pregnancies with at least one male fetus, compared to twin pregnancies with only female fetuses. Comparing male DNA concentration in pregnancies with two male fetuses versus pregnancies with one female fetus and one male fetus, we did not obtain a significant difference between the two groups due to a slight overlapping of the range values. Therefore, our test correctly predicted fetal gender, distinguishing twin pregnancies with at least one male fetus from twin pregnancies with only female fetuses, with a diagnostic accuracy of 100%. For distinguishing pregnancies with two male fetuses from pregnancies with both female and male fetuses, a diagnostic accuracy of 76.1% was achieved.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012
You have Access
1
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Potential Usefulness of Free Fetal DNA in Maternal Blood for Prenatal Fetal Gender Determination in Multiple Pregnancies
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The Potential Usefulness of Free Fetal DNA in Maternal Blood for Prenatal Fetal Gender Determination in Multiple Pregnancies
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The Potential Usefulness of Free Fetal DNA in Maternal Blood for Prenatal Fetal Gender Determination in Multiple Pregnancies
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *