Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-jpcp9 Total loading time: 0.245 Render date: 2022-12-05T04:18:50.334Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

A Genetic Epidemiologic Study of Social Support in a Chinese Sample

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2012

Wen-yan Ji
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.
Yong-hua Hu*
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China. jwy_hgs@sina.com
Yue-qin Huang
Affiliation:
Institute of Mental Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.
Wei-hua Cao
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.
Jun Lu
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.
Ying Qin
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.
Zeng-chang Peng
Affiliation:
Center for Disease Control and Prevention at Qingdao, Qingdao, China.
Shao-jie Wang
Affiliation:
Center for Disease Control and Prevention at Qingdao, Qingdao, China.
Li-ming Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.
*
*Address for correspondence: Yong-hua Hu, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, 38 Xue Yuan Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing, China 100083.

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

Accumulated evidence suggests that social support is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. However, there are little data that examine this issue from Asian samples. We reported results from a preliminary study that examined familial effects on social support in a Chinese adult twin sample. We administered a 10-item social support instrument that measures three dimensions of social support (i.e., objective support, subjective support, and utilization of support) developed for the Chinese population. Two hundred forty-two same-sex twin pairs, where both members of the pair completed the personal interview, were included in the final analysis. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate additive genetic (A), shared environmental (C), and nonshared environmental (E) effects on each dimension of social support. Familial factors (A+C) explained 56.63% [95% CI = 45.48–65.72%] and 42.42% [95% CI = 29.93–53.25%] of the total phenotypic variances of subjective support and utilization of support, respectively. For the objective support, genetic effects did not exist, but common environmental effect explained 37.56% [95% CI = 26.17–48.28%] of the total phenotypic variances. Neither gender nor age effects were seen on any dimension of social support. Except for objective support, genetic factors probably influence variation in subjective support and utilization of support. Shared environmental factors may influence all dimensions of social support.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008
You have Access
4
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A Genetic Epidemiologic Study of Social Support in a Chinese Sample
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

A Genetic Epidemiologic Study of Social Support in a Chinese Sample
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

A Genetic Epidemiologic Study of Social Support in a Chinese Sample
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *