Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-rbfsf Total loading time: 0.301 Render date: 2022-06-25T06:23:01.487Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Differences in Anthropometric Measurements between Sudanese Newborn Twins and Singletons

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2012

Eltahir M. Elshibly
Affiliation:
Departments of Paediatrics and Child Health University of Khartoum, Sudan and Clinic of Neonatology (Charité-University Medicine Berlin), Germany.
Gerd Schmalisch*
Affiliation:
Departments of Paediatrics and Child Health University of Khartoum, Sudan and Clinic of Neonatology (Charité-University Medicine Berlin), Germany. gerd.schmalisch@charite.de
*
*Address for Correspondence: Dr. G. Schmalisch, Clinic of Neonatology, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, D – 10117 Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

Twin pregnancies are associated with disturbed fetal growth and a higher risk of low birthweight (LBW), which is one of the most important determinants of perinatal morbidity and mortality in Africa. In this study, we compare anthropometric measurements in Sudanese twins and their mothers with singletons. Methods: In 1000 Sudanese mothers with singleton births and 30 mothers with twins, maternal (weight, height, mid-arm circumference) and 11 newborn anthropometric measurements were taken within 24 hours of delivery. Maternal education and socio-economic status were additionally recorded. Results: Mothers of twins had a significantly higher body weight (p = .045) and lean body mass (p = .02) after delivery, and were from higher social classes in general (p = .014). In addition to gestational age, twins displayed a statistically significant reduction in all anthropometric data, compared to singletons, mainly in terms of birth-weight, chest and head circumference, whereas differences in triceps and subscapular skin fold thickness and ponderal index were distinctly lower. The LBW rate in twins was markedly higher than that in singletons (43.3% vs. 8.3%, p < .001). In 20 out of 30 twins (66.7%), Twin A weighed more than Twin B (difference (SD) of 443 (335) g), and in the remaining 10 cases (33.7%), the weight of Twin B was equal to or more than that of twin A (difference (SD) of 211 (240) g, p = .039). In unlike-sex pairs, the mean (SD) difference between Twins A and B in birthweight was 459 (481) g, which was distinctly higher, compared to same-sex pairs (boys, 180 (325) g and girls, 36 (413) g). Conclusions: Sudanese twins displayed significantly reduced anthropometric measurements compared to singletons, but to different degrees. Gender had a higher impact on birthweight in twins than in singletons.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010
You have Access
4
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Differences in Anthropometric Measurements between Sudanese Newborn Twins and Singletons
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Differences in Anthropometric Measurements between Sudanese Newborn Twins and Singletons
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Differences in Anthropometric Measurements between Sudanese Newborn Twins and Singletons
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *