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DEBATING GENDER

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 January 2021

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Abstract

There is an ongoing public debate about sex, gender and identity that is often quite heated. This is an edited transcript of an informal lecture I recorded in 2019 to serve as a friendly guide to these complex issues. It represents my best attempt, not to score political points for any particular side, but to give an introductory map of the territory so that you can think for yourself, investigate further, and reach your own conclusions about such controversial questions as ‘What does mean to be a man or a woman?’

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Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal Institute of Philosophy, 2021

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References

1 This lecture is based on coursework supervised by Robin Dembroff, submitted as part of my PhD at Yale University. It was recorded on Whidbey Island, Washington, and published online on 15 January 2020. A link to a video of the lecture is here: https://youtu.be/LZERzw9BGrs. Please note that the full transcript, along with an appendix of key sources that have shaped my thinking, is available at B. D. Earp, ‘What is Your Gender? A Friendly Guide to the Public Debate’, Practical Ethics (2020): <http://blog.practicalethics.ox.ac.uk/2020/03/what-is-your-gender-a-friendly-guide-to-the-public-debate/>.

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