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An abductive framework for computing knowledge base updates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 November 2003

CHIAKI SAKAMA
Affiliation:
Department of Computer and Communication Sciences, Wakayama University, Wakayama 640 8510, Japan (e-mail: sakama@sys.wakayama-u.ac.jp)
KATSUMI INOUE
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Kobe University, Kobe 657 8501, Japan (e-mail: inoue@eedept.kobe-u.ac.jp)

Abstract

This paper introduces an abductive framework for updating knowledge bases represented by extended disjunctive programs. We first provide a simple transformation from abductive programs to update programs which are logic programs specifying changes on abductive hypotheses. Then, extended abduction, which was introduced by the same authors as a generalization of traditional abduction, is computed by the answer sets of update programs. Next, different types of updates, view updates and theory updates are characterized by abductive programs and computed by update programs. The task of consistency restoration is also realized as special cases of these updates. Each update problem is comparatively assessed from the computational complexity viewpoint. The result of this paper provides a uniform framework for different types of knowledge base updates, and each update is computed using existing procedures of logic programming.

Type
Regular Papers
Copyright
© 2003 Cambridge University Press

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Footnotes

This paper is a revised and extended version of (Sakama and Inoue, 1999).
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