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Cognitive behaviour therapy training in a developing country: a pilot study in Tanzania

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 December 2011

Lydia Stone*
Affiliation:
Looked After Children's Psychology Service, Permanence Team, Pavilion AG Civic Centre, Hounslow, Middlesex, UK
Fiona Warren
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK
*
*Author for correspondence: Dr L. Stone, Looked After Children's Psychology Service, Permanence Team, Pavilion AG Civic Centre, Lampton Road, Hounslow, Middlesex TW3 4DN, UK. (email: lydsgstone@hotmail.com)

Abstract:

Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective in treating mental health problems in the UK, but little has been done to evaluate the potential of CBT in developing countries. This paper aims to discuss the development and implementation of a CBT training course for clinicians working in Tanzania's main psychiatric hospital in the capital city, Dodoma. A 12-session training course in CBT was delivered to nine clinicians. An outcome evaluation was conducted using multiple measures and methods, taken before and after the training. Information on cultural adaptations of the training was obtained. All participants completed the course, but there were several obstacles to full completion of the evaluation measures. Despite this, there were significant improvements in clinicians’ basic understanding of CBT concepts, and their ability to apply the CBT model to formulate and recommend treatment strategies in response to a clinical case. Qualitative information indicated the potential of developing CBT training and implementation further. As a pilot study, this investigation shows the promise that CBT holds for mental health services in Tanzania. Further research into the training and clinical effectiveness of CBT in Tanzania is indicated.

Type
Education and supervision
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2011

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