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Brief cognitive–behavioural therapy for patients in the community with schizophrenia: Randomised controlled trial in Beijing, China - RETRACTION

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Zhi-Hua Guo
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Psychology & Beijing Key Lab of Mental Disorders, Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, and Centre of Schizophrenia, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing, People's Republic of China
Zhan-Jiang Li
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Psychology & Beijing Key Lab of Mental Disorders, Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, and Centre of Schizophrenia, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing, People's Republic of China
Yun Ma
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Psychology & Beijing Key Lab of Mental Disorders, Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, and Centre of Schizophrenia, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing, People's Republic of China
Jing Sun
Affiliation:
Menzies Health Institute Queensland and School of Medicine, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia
Jun-Hua Guo
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China
Wen-Xiu Li
Affiliation:
Mental Health Prevention Hospital of Haidian District, Beijing, People's Republic of China
Zhi-Qiang Wang
Affiliation:
Dongcheng District Stadium Road Community Health Care Centre, Beijing, People's Republic of China
Hui-Li Xu
Affiliation:
Chaoyang District Centre for Mental Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, People's Republic of China
Roger M. K. Ng
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Kowloon Hospital, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China
Douglas Turkington
Affiliation:
Newcastle University, Newcastle-on-Tyne, UK
David Kingdon
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
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Abstract

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Background

Brief cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) is an emerging treatment for schizophrenia in community settings; however, further trials are needed, especially in non-Western countries.

Aims

To test the effects of brief CBT for Chinese patients with schizophrenia in the community (trial registration: ChiCTR-TRC-13003709).

Method

A total of 220 patients with schizophrenia from four districts of Beijing were randomly assigned to either brief CBT plus treatment as usual (TAU) or TAU alone. Patients were assessed at baseline, post-treatment and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups by raters masked to group allocation.

Results

At the post-treatment assessment and the 12-month follow-up, patients who received brief CBT showed greater improvement in overall symptoms, general psychopathology, insight and social functioning. In total, 37.3% of those in the brief CBT plus TAU group experienced a clinically significant response, compared with only 19.1% of those in the TAU alone group (P = 0.003).

Conclusions

Brief CBT has a positive effect on Chinese patients with schizophrenia in the community.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2017 

Footnotes

Declaration of interest

None.

References

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