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The treatment of sexually dysfunctional men without partners: A controlled study of three behavioural group approaches

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 January 2018

Ariel Stravynski*
Affiliation:
Fernand Seguin Research Center, Montreal, and University of Montreal
Giles Gaudette
Affiliation:
Fernand Seguin Research Center, Montreal, and University of Montreal
Alain Lesage
Affiliation:
Fernand Seguin Research Center, Montreal, and University of Montreal
Nira Arbel
Affiliation:
Fernand Seguin Research Center, Montreal, and University of Montreal
Pascale Petit
Affiliation:
Fernand Seguin Research Center, Montreal, and University of Montreal
Doris Clerc
Affiliation:
Fernand Seguin Research Center, Montreal, and University of Montreal
José Fabian
Affiliation:
Fernand Seguin Research Center, Montreal, and Louis-H. Lafontaine Hospital
Yves Lamontagne
Affiliation:
Fernand Seguin Research Center, Montreal
Robert Langlois
Affiliation:
Louis-H. Lafontaine Hospital
Olivier Lipp
Affiliation:
Fernand Seguin Research Center, Montreal, University of Montreal, and Louis-H. Lafontaine Hospital
Paul Sidoun
Affiliation:
Louis-H. Lafontaine Hospital, Montreal
*
Dr Ariel Stravynski, Fernand Seguin Research Center, 7331 Hochelaga, Montreal, Quebec HIN 3V2, Canada

Abstract

Background

Models of sex therapy for sexual dysfunction in single men are available, but their value is not well established. This controlled study compared three approaches to the treatment of sexually dysfunctional single men.

Method

Sixty-nine single men diagnosed as sexually dysfunctional were randomly assigned to treatments focusing on either their sexual dysfunction, their interpersonal problems, a combination of both or a waiting list; 51 completed treatment and 50 the one-year follow-up. Treatment was administered in small groups in 15 weekly sessions and four six-weekly sessions during the first six months of a year-long follow-up.

Results

No clinically meaningful change was observed during the waiting period. In contrast, a significant and equivalent improvement was observed in all treatment groups by the end of treatment. However, differences between them were in evidence at 6 and 12 months' follow-up.

Conclusions

Both treatments paying attention to the patients' interpersonal difficulties resulted in significantly better outcomes overall than the approach that concentrated on problems in sexual functioning alone.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

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