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Relatives as a Resource in the Management of Functional Illness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

Liz Kuipers
Affiliation:
District Services Centre, The Maudsley Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AZ. Institute of Psychiatry
Paul Bebbington
Affiliation:
MRC Social Psychiatry Unit, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF

Extract

Though there is evidence that the burdens which people face when they live with someone suffering from a functional pyschiatric illness have a considerable effect on both relatives and patients, very little is done in routine clinical practice to help in dealing with them. However, intervention with relatives is both practicable and effective, and sufficient is now known to indicate tentative guidelines for involving relatives in the management of patients by the psychiatric services. Strategies are suggested for dealing with problems of this sort which are faced by relatives.

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Copyright
Copyright © 1985 The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

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