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The Effects of Phenothiazines on Endocrine Function: II

Effects in Men and Post-Menopausal Women

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

P. J. V. Beumont
Affiliation:
Littlemore Hospital
C. S. Corker
Affiliation:
Department of Human Anatomy, University of Oxford
H. G. Friesen
Affiliation:
Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal; now at Dept. of Physiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
T. Kolakowska
Affiliation:
Littlemore Hospital
B. M. Mandelbrote
Affiliation:
Littlemore Hospital
J. Marshall
Affiliation:
DecHospital, Ducane Road, London W12 0HS
M. A. F. Murray
Affiliation:
Department of Human Anatomy, University of Oxford
D. H. Wiles
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, The Warneford Hospital, Oxford OX3 7JX

Extract

There is ample evidence that high doses of phenothiazines and other neuroleptics depress the pituitary-gonadal axis in experimental animals (De Wied, 1967), but the effects of these drugs on sex hormones in human subjects are still controversial (Shader and Di Mascio, 1970). Literature concerning growth hormone (GH) is even more controversial, since phenothiazines have been found to inhibit GH release in rodents (Muller et al., 1967) but to increase it in the rhesus monkey (Meyer and Knobil, 1967). In human subjects phenothiazines have been reported to depress both basal levels of GH and the response to hypoglycaemia (Sherman et al., 1971), while others have found that this response is enhanced (Schimmelbusch, Mueller and Scheps, 1971). Studies of prolactin levels are more consistent, showing raised prolactin both in experimental animals and in human subjects following administration of phenothiazines (Apostolakis et al., 1972; Hwang et al., 1971; Kleinberg et al., 1971; Sulman, 1970).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1974 

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