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Criteria for Diagnosing Reversible Dementia Caused by Depression: Validation by 2-year Follow-up

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

Peter V. Rabins
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
Altaf Merchant
Affiliation:
11 East Chase Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA

Summary

Eighteen patients fulfilling DSM-III criteria for both major depression and dementia were matched by age and sex to patients with a diagnosis of irreversible dementia and patients with a diagnosis of major depression. A past history of depression, self reports of depressed mood, self blaming, hopeless and somatic delusions, an appetite disturbance and subacute onset identified the patients suffering from dementia caused by depression. Two year follow-up confirmed the initial diagnosis and demonstrated that coexisting cognitive impairment and major depression are not usually precursory to a progressive dementing illness.

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Papers
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

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