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Counselling the Relatives of the Long-Term Adult Mentally Ill

II. A Low-Cost Supportive Model

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Liz Kuipers
Affiliation:
Psychology Department, Institute of Psychiatry and District Services Centre, Maudsley Hospital
Brigid MacCarthy
Affiliation:
Academic Unit, St Bernard's Wing, Ealing Hospital and Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School
Jane Hurry
Affiliation:
District Services Centre, Maudsley Hospital
Rod Harper
Affiliation:
St Charles' Hospital
Alain LeSage
Affiliation:
Centre de Recherche, Hôpital Luis-H Lafontaine, Montreal, Canada

Abstract

A psychosocial intervention is described geared to the needs of carers of the long-term mentally ill, which is feasible for a busy clinical team to implement: relatives were not selected for the group by patient diagnosis or motivation and little extra staff input was required. An interactive education session at home was followed by a monthly relatives group which aimed to reduce components of expressed emotion (EE) and to alleviate burden. The group facilitators adopted a directive but non-judgemental style, and constructive coping efforts were encouraged. The intervention was effective at reducing EE and improving family relationships. The study offers a realistic model of how to offer support to people providing long-term care for the severely mentally ill.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1989 

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