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Clinical utility of the parent-reported Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire as a screen for emotional and behavioural difficulties in children and adolescents with intellectual disability

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 November 2020

Caitlin A. Murray
Affiliation:
Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
Richard P. Hastings
Affiliation:
Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK; and Centre for Developmental Psychiatry and Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
Vasiliki Totsika
Affiliation:
Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK; and Centre for Developmental Psychiatry and Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; and Division of Psychiatry, University College London, UK
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Summary

We assessed the clinical utility of the parent-reported Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) as a screen for emotional and behavioural difficulties in 626 children and young people with intellectual disability. Using the Developmental Behavior Checklist (DBC2-P) to determine clinical caseness, the area under the curve for the SDQ total difficulties score was 0.876 (95% CI 0.841–0.911), indicating that it is a good measure for identifying significant emotional and behavioural difficulties requiring further investigation. Analyses supported the use of the same SDQ cut-off for those with and without intellectual disability, which may assist with consistent and comparable assessment in clinical practice.

Type
Short report
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Royal College of Psychiatrists

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Clinical utility of the parent-reported Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire as a screen for emotional and behavioural difficulties in children and adolescents with intellectual disability
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Clinical utility of the parent-reported Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire as a screen for emotional and behavioural difficulties in children and adolescents with intellectual disability
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