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Amphetamine-Induced Dysphoria in Postmenopausal Women

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

Uriel Halbreich
Affiliation:
Division of Behavioral Endocrinology, Department of Psychiatry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
Gregory Asnis
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York
Donald Ross
Affiliation:
Computer Center, Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York
Jean Endicott
Affiliation:
Research Assessment and Training Unit, Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York

Summary

Dextroamphetamine (0.15 mg/kg) intravenously administered to a group of normal postmenopausal women induced a dysphoric reaction with drowsiness, annoyance, sadness and anger. Young normal men, receiving the same dosage, responded with elation of mood and alertness. It is suggested that age and hypoestrogenism may alter the behavioural response to amphetamine.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1981 

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References

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