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5-HIAA in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Deficit Schizophrenic Characteristics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 January 2018

John G. Csernansky*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine; Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center, Psychiatry Service
Roy J. King
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine
William O. Faustman
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine; Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center, Psychiatry Service
James A. Moses Jr
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine; Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center, Psychiatry Service
Margaret E. Poscher
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine
Kym F. Faull
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine
*
Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3801 Miranda Ave, Ward 4C2, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA

Abstract

Higher CSF 5-HIAA concentrations and lower CSF HVA concentrations have been associated with various measures of slowed motor behaviour and communication in schizophrenic patients. To derive a single, reliable measure of deficit characteristics in schizophrenic patients, we entered four items of the BPRS reflecting negative symptoms, a work history measure derived from the Strauss-Carpenter scale, and three subscale scores of the WAIS-R into a principal-components analysis to derive a single factor score. The CSF 5-HIAA concentrations were within the normal range of values, and correlated directly with this factor score, but CSF HVA concentrations were not associated with the deficit factor score. These findings add support to the hypothesis that brain serotonin function is associated with deficit schizophrenic characteristics.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1990 

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