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Hard X-rays from the southern sky

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 August 2015

Walter H. G. Lewin
Affiliation:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., U.S.A.
Jeffrey E. Mcclintock
Affiliation:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., U.S.A.
William B. Smith
Affiliation:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., U.S.A.

Abstract

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On March 20, 1969, we scanned the Southern sky for 8 hours in a manner similar to that during our October 15, 1967 observations. A quick look at the data shows clearly that the brightness of Cen XR-2 in the energy range above 20 keV has significantly decreased since our first observation. At this stage of the data analysis we can put an upper limit on the intensity of Cen XR-2 which is 1/3 the intensity observed by us on October 15, 1967. From further data analyses we will be able to determine the intensity of the source more precisely.

During the same flight we observed Sco X-l, Nor XR-2, and the sources M-l, M-2, M-3, and M-4. Results on these observations will become available by May 1970.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Reidel 1970 

References

Lewin, W. H. G., Clark, G. W., and Smith, W. B.: 1968, Astrophys. J. 152, L49.

CrossRef

∗∗ The final results on Cen XR-2 will be available in Febr. 1970; they will be published shortly thereafter.

Lewin, W. H. G., Clark, G. W., Gerassimenko, M., and Smith, W. B.: 1969, Nature 223, 1142.

CrossRef
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