Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-prt4h Total loading time: 0.137 Render date: 2021-10-17T04:31:35.721Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Evolutionary population synthesis: the effect of binary systems

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 May 2016

J. Miguel Mas-Hesse
Affiliation:
LAEFF-INTA, P.O. Box 50727, E-28080 Madrid, Spain
Miguel Cerviño
Affiliation:
LAEFF-INTA, P.O. Box 50727, E-28080 Madrid, Spain

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

We present in this contribution our set of multi-wavelength synthesis models including the evolution of single and binary stars. The main results we have obtained can be summarized as follows: (a) massive close-binary systems will start to experience mass transfer episodes after the first 4Myr of the starburst evolution; (b) as a result of these mass transfer processes, stars of relatively low initial mass can lose completely their envelope and become a Wolf-Rayet star. In this way, the formation of WR stars is extended over longer than 15 Myr, and does not stop at 6Myr as predicted by models including only single stars; (c) WR stars can thus be coeval with red supergiants, which peak at around 10 Myr for solar metallicities; (d) the accretion of mass will originate relatively massive stars at ages for which they should have already disappeared; these stars, together with the WR stars formed in rather evolved clusters, increase the production of ionizing photons, so that the Hβ equivalent width will not drop as rapidly as predicted by models considering only individual stars; and (e) the mass transfer to compact companions will produce an additional source of high-energy radiation in the form of high-mass X-ray binaries, not predicted either by standard synthesis models.

Type
Part 5. Wolf-Rayet stars and other massive stars in starburst galaxies: the case of Wolf-Rayet galaxies (integrated spectra)
Copyright
Copyright © Astronomical Society of the Pacific 1999 

References

Arnault, Ph. 1990, Ph.D. Thesis, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris Google Scholar
Cerviño, M., Mas-Hesse, J.M. 1994, A&A 284, 749 (CMH) Google Scholar
Cerviño, M., Mas-Hesse, J.M., Kunth, D. 1996, in: Vreux, J.-M., Detal, A., Fraipont-Caro, D., Gosset, E. & Rauw, G. (eds.), Wolf-Rayet Stars in the Framework of Stellar Evolution, Proc. 33-rd Liège Int. Astroph. Coll., (Liège: Univ. of Liège), p. 613,Google Scholar
De Greve, J.P., de Loore, C.W.H. 1992, A&AS 96, 653 Google Scholar
González-Delgado, R., Heckman, T., Leitherer, C., Meurer, G., Krolik, J., Wilson, A.S., Kinney, A., Koratkar, A. 1998, ApJ 505, 174 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heckman, T.M., González-Delgado, R., Leitherer, C., Meurer, G., Krolik, J., Kinney, A., Koratkar, A., Wilson, A.S. 1997, ApJ 482, 114 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Langer, N. 1989, A&A 210, 93 Google Scholar
Maeder, A., Meynet, G. 1994, A&A 287, 803 Google Scholar
Mas-Hesse, J.M., Kunth, D. 1991, A&AS 88, 399 (MHK) Google Scholar
Meurs, E.J.A., van den Heuvel, E.P.J. 1989, A&A, 226, 88 Google Scholar
Schaerer, D., Maeder, A. 1992, A&A 263, 129 Google Scholar
Schaerer, D., Vacca, W.D. 1998, ApJ 497, 618 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schaller, G., Schaerer, D., Meynet, G., Maeder, A. 1992, A&AS 96, 269 Google Scholar
Van Bever, J., Vanbeveren, D. 1998, A&A 334, 21 Google Scholar
Vanbeveren, D., Conti, P.S. 1980, A&A 80, 230 Google Scholar
Vanbeveren, D. 1991, A&A 252, 159 Google Scholar
Vanbeveren, D., Van Bever, J., de Donder, E. 1997, A&A 317, 487 Google Scholar
Vanbeveren, D., de Donder, E., Van Bever, J., Van Rensbergen, W., de Loore, C.W.H. 1998, New Astronomy 3, 443 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Evolutionary population synthesis: the effect of binary systems
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Evolutionary population synthesis: the effect of binary systems
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Evolutionary population synthesis: the effect of binary systems
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *