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Input in an Institutional Setting

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2008

Kathleen Bardovi-Harlig
Affiliation:
Indiana University
Beverly S. Hartford
Affiliation:
Indiana University

Extract

This paper investigates the nature of input available to learners in the institutional setting of the academic advising session. The advisory session, an unequal status encounter that by nature is a private speech event and cannot be observed by other learners, provides a starting point for the investigation of real and perceived availability of input. Evidence for the realization of speech acts as well as appropriate content and form, positive evidence from peers and status unequals, the effect of stereotypes, and limitations of a learner's pragmatic and grammatical competence are factors that may influence the course of development of interlanguage pragmatics in the institutional setting.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1996

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