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Thomas Rudborne, monk of Winchester, and the council of Florence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2016

Joan G. Greatrex*
Affiliation:
Carleton university, Ottawa

Extract

One of the ways in which historians show their wisdom is by their reluctance to make general, definitive pronouncements. Is there anyone among us, for example, who can say with certainty that the spirit of ecumenism abroad today is deeper and more prevalent than in any preceding age? The history of ecumenical councils is the history of the Church’s constant striving to reconcile heretics and end schism. Furthermore, it is surely not true to say that concern for the unity of Christendom has been confined in the past only to the small group of council delegates who for spiritual, theological and often, unfortunately, political reasons were, so to speak, professionally involved. However, before I am anathematised for expounding on a negative generalisation let me hasten to draw your attention to the ecumenical interests of Thomas Rudborne, O.S.B.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Ecclesiastical History Society 1972

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References

page no 171 note 1 It is numbered 183, and is a volume containing 218 folios which measure 12 inches by 7¾ inches.

page no 171 note 2 1, pp 179-285.

page no 171 note 3 Folios 160v to 162v according to the pencilled enumeration at the top of each folio.

page no 172 note 1 Bishop of Durham, 1438 to 1457.

page no 172 note 2 Fols 112r/v.

page no 172 note 3 I p xxvii. ‘Dedicata est Ecclesia Wintoniensis armo CLXIX. IV. Cal. Novembr. A prima fundatione et dedicatione Winton. ecclesis fluxerunt anni MCCLXXXV.’ This statement is accepted by A. F. Pollard in DNB.

page no 172 note 4 Historia Maior, fols 134r/v, my rendering of Rudborne’s words.

page no 172 note 5 Fol 135r.

page no 172 note 6 A History of the Crusades, 111, The Kingdom of Acre (Cambridge 1954) p 483.

page no 172 note 7 According to Stewart, A. in his translation of The History of Jerusalem by Jacques de Vitry, Palestine Pilgrims’ Text Society, XXXI (London 1896) p V Google Scholar.

page no 172 note 8 I, p 267; ipse [Brocardus] Vitriaci librum nunquam vidit.’

page no 173 note 1 Columna Epithoma Historiarum (Lübeck 1475) 1, fol clxxx, c II.

page no 173 note 2 Fol 134V.

page no 173 note 3 Fol 160V.

page no 173 note 4 Ibid. The words are from Burchard.

page no 173 note 5 Ibid.

page no 173 note 6 Ibid. The English paraphrases the Latin.

page no 173 note 7 Gill, [J.], [The Council of Florence] (Cambridge 1959)Google Scholar.

page no 173 note 8 James Tait in DNB. See also Emden, [A.B.], [A Biographical Register of the University of Oxford to A.D. 1500], 3 vols (Oxford 1957-9) 11 Google Scholar.

page no 174 note 1 Ibid.

page no 174 note 2 Emden, A.B., A Biographical Register of the University of Cambridge to 1500 (Cambridge 1963)Google Scholar.

page no 174 note 3 BM MS Harley 3838 fol 98r.

page no 174 note 4 Fasciculi Zizaniorum ed Shirley, W. W., RS 5 (1858) p 417 Google Scholar.

page no 174 note 5 Emden, 111.

page no 174 note 6 Fol 205r.

page no 174 note 7 BM MS Harley 1819. Codex chartaceus...in quo continentur collectanea Joannis Balaei, fol 67r.

page no 174 note 8 Anglorum Heliades, fol 105r.

page no 174 note 9 Bale, J., Illustrium Maioris Britannie Scriptorum Summarium (Ipswich 1548) VIII, p 39 Google Scholar.

page no 174 note 10 Hunt was alive until 1478.

page no 175 note 1 Knowles, D., The Religious Orders in England, 11 (Cambridge 1955) p 145 Google Scholar. The history of the Carmelites in England has yet to be written, but the task may be at present an impossible one in view of the scanty materials available. Knowles mentions one unpublished MA thesis (Manchester, 1933): M.E.Turner, ‘Some aspects of the English Carmelites in the first half of the fifteenth century.’ Unfortunately this MS has recently been lost!

page no 175 note 2 Gill, p 133.

page no 175 note 3 Fol 162 v.

page no 175 note 4 Fol 162 v.

page no 176 note 1 Fol 162V. Gill states that the Latin spokesmen quoted from the Greek as well as the Latin fathers to support their case, Gill, Chs VI-VIII.

page no 176 note 2 Fol 162r.

page no 176 note 3 Fol 163r.

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