Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-mm7gn Total loading time: 0.234 Render date: 2022-08-11T17:43:09.890Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

State-Level Measures of Institutional Budgetary Influence from the American State Administrators Project: 1964–98

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 January 2021

Nelson C. Dometrius*
Affiliation:
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, USA
Cynthia Bowling
Affiliation:
Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA
Margaret R. Ferguson
Affiliation:
Indiana University–Purdue University, Indianapolis, USA
Deil S. Wright
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
*
Nelson C. Dometrius, Texas Tech University, Boston & Akron Streets, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA Email: nelson.dometrius@ttu.edu

Abstract

The American State Administrators Project is a half-century long research program surveying the attitudes and behavior of state agency leaders. The project has produced a voluminous number of publications and conference papers. At the same time it has also faced several difficulties in making its data more widely available to the scholarly community. This paper describes the Project, some of the data difficulties it has faced, and the portion of the data being distributed with this article.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Abney, Glenn, and Lauth, Thomas P.. 1987. “Perceptions of the Impact of Governors and Legislatures in the Appropriations Process.” Western Political Quarterly 40:335–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Abney, Glenn, and Lauth, Thomas P.. 1998. “The End of Executive Dominance in State Appropriations.” Public Administration Review 58(5): 388–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baranowski, Michael, and Gross, Donald A.. 2006. “Influence over State Agency Activities: A Test of Two Survey-Based Measures.” State Politics & Policy Quarterly 6(2): 220–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bowling, Cynthia J., Cho, Chung-Lae, and Wright, Deil S.. 2004. “Establishing a Continuum from Minimizing to Maximizing Bureaucrats: State Agency Head Preferences for Governmental Expansion—A Typology of Administrator Growth Postures, 1964–98.” Public Administration Review 64(4): 489–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bowling, Cynthia J., and Ferguson, Margaret R.. 2001. “Divided Government, Interest Representation, and Policy Differences: Competing Explanations of Gridlock in the Fifty States.” Journal of Politics 63:182206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clarke, Wes. 1997. “Budget Requests and Agency Head Selection Methods.” Political Research Quarterly 50(2): 301–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clarke, Wes. 1998. “Divided Government and Budget Conflict in the U.S. States.” Legislative Studies Quarterly 23(1): 522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dometrius, Nelson C., and Wright, Deil S.. 2002. “Governors and State Budgets: Stability, Changes, and Challenges.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Savannah, GA.Google Scholar
Dometrius, Nelson C., and Wright, Deil S.. 2004. “Budgetary Influence: Governors versus Legislatures.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, New Orleans, LA.Google Scholar
Dometrius, Nelson C., and Wright, Deil S.. 2005. “Divided Government and Comparative Institutional Influences over State Budgets Across Four Decades.” Paper presented at the Fifth Annual Conference on State Politics and Policy, Michigan State University, East Lansing.Google Scholar
Dometrius, Nelson C., and Wright, Deil S.. 2009a. “Governors, Legislatures, and State Budgets Across time.” Political Research Quarterly. 63:4 (December): 783–95.Google Scholar
Dometrius, Nelson C., and Wright, Deil S.. 2009. “State-Level Measures of Institutional Budgetary Influence from the American State Administrators Project (ASAP): 1964–1998.” Paper presented at the Ninth Annual State Politics and Policy Conference, Duke University and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill North Carolina.Google Scholar
Dometrius, Nelson C., Wright, Deil S., and Burke, Brendan. 2008. “Strategies for Measuring Influence over State Agencies.” State Politics & Policy Quarterly 8(1): 88100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Durant, Robert. 2010. “Theory to Practice: Celebrating a Life and a Legacy.” Public Administration Review 70(1): 25.Google Scholar
Goodman, Doug. 2007. “Determinants of Perceived Gubernatorial Budgetary Influence among State Executive Budget Analysts and Legislative Fiscal Analysts.” Political Research Quarterly 60(March): 4354.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hebert, F. Ted, Brudney, Jeffrey L., and Wright, Deil S.. 1983. “Gubernatorial Influence and State Bureaucracy.” American Politics Research 11(2): 243–64.Google Scholar
Kelleher, Christine A., and Yackee, Susan Webb. 2006. “Who's Whispering in Your Ear? The Influence of Third Parties over State Agency Decisions.” Political Research Quarterly 59(4): 629–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moncrief, Gary F., and Thompson, Joel A.. 1980. “Partisanship and Purse Strings: A Research Note on Sharkansky.” Western Political Quarterly 33:336–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ryu, Jay Eungha, Bowling, Cynthia J., Cho, Chung-Lae, and Wright, Deil S.. 2007. “Effects of Administrators' Aspirations, Political Principals' Priorities, and Interest Groups' Influence on State Agency Budget Requests.” Public Budgeting & Finance 27(2): 2249.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ryu, Jay Eungha, Bowling, Cynthia J., Cho, Chung-Lae, and Wright, Deil S.. 2008. “Exploring Explanations of State Agency Budgets: Institutional Budget Actors or Exogenous Environment?Public Budgeting & Finance 28(3): 2347.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sabato, Larry. 1983. Good-bye to Good-Time Charlie. 2nd ed. Washington, DC: CQ Press.Google Scholar
Sharkansky, Ira. 1968. “Agency Requests, Gubernatorial Support, and Budget Success in State Legislatures.” American Political Science Review 26(December): 1220–31.Google Scholar
Sigelman, Lee. 1986. “The Bureaucrat as Budget Maximizer: An Assumption Examined.” Public Budgeting & Finance 6(Spring): 50–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sigelman, Lee, and Dometrius, Nelson C.. 1988. “Governors as Chief Administrators: The Linkage between Formal Powers and Informal Influence.” American Politics Quarterly 16(April): 157–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thompson, Joel A. 1987. “Agency Requests, Gubernatorial Support, and Budget Success in State Legislatures Revisited.” Journal of Politics 49:756–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wildavsky, Aaron. 1988. The New Politics of Budgetary Process. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman.Google Scholar
Wright, Deil S. 1967. “Executive Leadership in State Administration.” Midwest Journal of Political Science 11(1): 126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
1
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

State-Level Measures of Institutional Budgetary Influence from the American State Administrators Project: 1964–98
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

State-Level Measures of Institutional Budgetary Influence from the American State Administrators Project: 1964–98
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

State-Level Measures of Institutional Budgetary Influence from the American State Administrators Project: 1964–98
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *