Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-2wqtr Total loading time: 0.172 Render date: 2021-09-21T15:22:27.491Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Patterns of Radicalization in Political Activism

An Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 January 2016

Extract

Research on political violence occurs in waves, generally corresponding to the successive swells of violence that in many ways define modern society. Critically, this violence is characterized as much by diversity as by uniformity. As each new spate in research on political violence has shown us, rarely can we generalize about either the aims or the repertoires of action of the purveyors of violence. Some similar mechanisms are in play, however, as violence develops from political conflicts between states and their opponents.

This suggestion comes from social movement studies, whose influence is increasing in the analysis of political violence. These studies developed especially from a critique of ‘terrorism studies,’ which emerged within security studies as a branch of international relations and have traditionally been more oriented toward developing antiterrorist policies than toward a social scientific understanding of political violence.

Type
Special Section: Cultures of Radicalization: Discourse and Practices of Political Violence and Terrorism
Copyright
Copyright © Social Science History Association 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Breen Smyth, Marie (2007) “A critical research agenda for the study of political terror.” European Political Science 6 (3): 26067.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crenshaw, Martha (2010) Explaining Terrorism: Causes, Processes, and Consequences. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
della Porta, Donatella (1995) Social Movements, Political Violence, and the State. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
George, Alexander (1991) “The discipline of terrorology,” in George, Alexander (ed.) Western State Terrorism. Cambridge: Polity: 76101.Google Scholar
Goodwin, Jeff (2004) “What must we explain to explain terrorism?Social Movement Studies 3 (2): 25965.Google Scholar
Gunning, Jeroen (2009) “Social movement theory and the study of terrorism,” in Jackson, Richard Smyth, Marie Breen Gunning, Jeroen (eds.) Critical Terrorism Studies: A New Research Agenda. London: Routledge: 15678.Google Scholar
Horgan, John (2005) “The social and psychological characteristics of terrorism and terrorists,” in Bjorgo, Tore (ed.) Root Causes of Terrorism: Myths, Reality, and Ways Forward. London: Routledge: 4453.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jackson, Richard Smyth, Marie Breen Gunning, Jeroen, eds. (2009) “Introduction: The case for critical terrorism studies,” in Jackson, Richard Smyth, Marie Breen Gunning, Jeroen (eds.) Critical Terrorism Studies: A New Research Agenda. London: Routledge: 19.Google Scholar
Ranstorp, Magnus (2009) “Mapping terrorism studies after 9/11,” in Jackson, Richard Smyth, Marie Breen Gunning, Jeroen (eds.) Critical Terrorism Studies: A New Research Agenda. London: Routledge: 1333.Google Scholar
Schmid, Alex P. Jongman, Albert J. (1988) Political Terrorism. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.Google Scholar
Silke, Andrew (2003) “Preface,” in Silke, Andrew (ed.) Terrorists, Victims, and Society: Psychological Perspectives on Terrorism and Its Consequences. Chichester: Wiley: xvxxi.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Waldmann, Peter (2007) Guerra civil, terrorismo y anomia social: El caso colombiano en un contexto globalizado. Bogotá: Norma.Google Scholar
Wiktorowicz, Quentin (2004) “Islamic activism in social movement theory,” in Wiktorowicz, Quentin (ed.) Islamic Activism: A Social Movement Theory Approach. Bloomington: Indiana University Press: 133.Google Scholar
2
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Patterns of Radicalization in Political Activism
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Patterns of Radicalization in Political Activism
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Patterns of Radicalization in Political Activism
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *