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Black Flight: Lethal Violence and the Great Migration, 1900–1930

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 January 2016

Extract

After decades of relative residential stability, southern blacks began migrating in striking numbers following the turn of the twentieth century. Reconstruction and Redemption saw a fair amount of short-distance movement as black tenant farmers exchanged one landlord for another in search of favorable financial arrangements. Some blacks moved across state lines, generally toward the Southwest, in pursuit of King Cotton and the livelihood it promised. However, these population movements pale in comparison with the massive migration of southern blacks during the first half of this century.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Social Science History Association 1990

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