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Missing Elements of a Child Protection System in China: The Case of LX

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 December 2010

Ilan Katz
Affiliation:
Social Policy Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia E-mail: ilan.katz@unsw.edu.au
Xiaoyuan Shang
Affiliation:
Social Policy Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Australia
Yahua Zhang
Affiliation:
China Civil Affairs College, Beijing

Abstract

Many of the systems which had protected vulnerable children in China have broken down, but China has not developed a modern child protection system. We present initial findings from a project which investigates responses to child abuse and the potential for developing a comprehensive protection process. The research found that physical chastisement is commonly practised. Other forms of maltreatment tend to be denied. There are no mechanisms to report abuse and no organisation taking a lead in child protection. Furthermore, there is great reluctance by professionals and the public to identify or report child abuse and neglect.

Type
Themed Section on Moving towards Human Rights Based Social Policies in China
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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