Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-cnwzk Total loading time: 0.323 Render date: 2021-07-28T00:37:13.050Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Ecophysiology of seed germination in Mediterranean geophytes. 1. Muscari spp

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2007

Maria A. Doussi
Affiliation:
Department of Botany, Faculty of Biology, University of Athens, Athens 15784, Greece
Costas A. Thanos
Affiliation:
Department of Botany, Faculty of Biology, University of Athens, Athens 15784, Greece
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Ecophysiological aspects of seed germination were investigated in four Mediterranean geophytes of the genus Muscari (Liliaceae): M. comosum (tassel hyacinth), M. neglectum (common grape hyacinth), M. commutatum and M. weissii. Experiments were performed at constant temperatures in the dark and under temperature and light conditions simulating those prevailing in nature during November–January, i.e. well into the rainy season of the Mediterranean climate. In all species, no primary dormancy was revealed, and germination occurred in a rather narrow range of cool temperatures (optimum at 10 or 15°C) and at a remarkably slow rate; both germination characteristics seem to be associated with autumn/winter seed germination and seedling establishment. Such a postulated strategy is ecologically advantageous within an unpredictable rainfall regime, known to prevail during the start of the rainy period of the Mediterranean climate. This strategy may also explain the spread of germination of M. comosum seeds over two consecutive years, observed by Theophrastus. Far-red light, simulating light conditions under a dense canopy, resulted in only a slight delay of germination compared to dark controls. Diurnal white light, qualitatively simulating natural daylight, caused a significant decrease of the germination rate in all four species studied. Moreover, white light was found to suppress considerably final seed germination (photoinhibition) in M. weissii and M. neglectum; in the latter species, prolonged imbibition under white light also led to the induction of secondary dormancy.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2002

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Baskin, C.C. and Baskin, J.M. (1998) In Seeds. Ecology, biogeography, and evolution of dormancy and germination. San Diego, Academic Press.Google Scholar
Bentzer, B. (1969) Chromosome morphology in Aegean populations of Leopoldia Parl. (Liliaceae). Botaniska Notiser 122, 457480.Google Scholar
Bentzer, B. (1972) Structural chromosome polymorphism in diploid Leopoldia weissii (Freyn) Freyn ex Heldr. (Liliaceae). Botaniska Notiser 125, 180185.Google Scholar
Bentzer, B. (1972) Variation in the chromosome complement of Leopoldia comosa (L.) Parl. (Liliaceae) in the Aegean (Greece). Botaniska Notiser 125, 406418.Google Scholar
Bentzer, B. (1973) Taxonomy, variation and evolution in representatives of Leopoldia Parl. (Liliaceae) in the southern and central Aegean. Botaniska Notiser 126, 69132.Google Scholar
Boeken, B. and Gutterman, Y. (1990) The effect of temperature on seed germination in three common bulbous plants of different habitats in the Central Negev Desert of Israel. Journal of Arid Environments 18, 175184.Google Scholar
Dalgic, G. (1991) Cytotaxonomical studies on the genus Muscari in European Turkey. Botanika Chronika 10, 819825.Google Scholar
Davis, P.H. and Stuart, D.C. (1984) Muscari Miller. pp 245263. Davis, P.H. (Eds) Flora of Turkey and the East Aegean Islands. Vol. 8. Edinburgh, Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
Delipetrou, P. (1996) Ecophysiology of seed germination in maritime plants with emphasis on the action of light (in Greek). PhD thesis, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.Google Scholar
Garbari, F. (1984) Some karyological and taxonomic remarks on the Italian Muscari (Liliaceae). Webbia 38, 139164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gutterman, Y., Kamenetsky, R. and Van Rooyen, M. (1995) A comparative study of seed germination of two Allium species from different habitats in the Negev Desert highlands. Journal of Arid Environments 29, 305315.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kadiss, C.C. (1995) On the reproductive biology of the strictly protected plants of Cyprus (in Greek). PhD thesis, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.Google Scholar
Karlén, T. (1984) Muscari pulchellum (Liliaceae) and associated taxa in Greece and W. Turkey. Willdenowia 14, 89118.Google Scholar
Keeley, J.E. and Bond, W.J. (1997) Convergent seed germination in South African fynbos and Californian chaparral. Plant Ecology 133, 153167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keeley, J.E. and Keeley, S.C. (1987) Role of fire in the germination of chaparral herbs and suffrutescents. Madroño 34, 240249.Google Scholar
Keeley, J.E., Morton, B.A., Pedrosa, A. and Trotter, P. (1985) Role of allelopathy, heat and charred wood in the germination of chaparral herbs and suffrutescents. Journal of Ecology 73, 445458.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keren, A. and Evenari, M. (1974) Some ecological aspects of distribution and germination of Pancratium maritimum L. Israel Journal of Botany 23, 202215.Google Scholar
Müller-Schneider, P. (1983) Verbreitungsbiologie (Diasporologie) der Blütenpflanzen. Veröffentlichungen des Geobotanischen Institutes der ETH, Stiftung Rübel, Zürich 61, 1226.Google Scholar
Müller-Schneider, P. (1986) Verbreitungsbiologie der Blütenpflanzen Graubündens. Veröffentlichungen des Geobotanischen Institutes der ETH 85, 1263.Google Scholar
Negbi, M. (1989) Theophrastus on geophytes. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 100, 1543.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Newman, P. (1980) Chipping for germination. The Garden 105, 297298.Google Scholar
Skordilis, A. and Thanos, C.A. (1995) Seed stratification and germination strategy in the Mediterranean pines Pinus brutia and P. halepensis. Seed Science Research 5, 151160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stuart, D.C. (1970) Chromosome numbers in the genus Muscari. Notes of the Royal Botanic Garden of Edinburgh 30, 189196.Google Scholar
Thanos, C.A. (1993) Germination ecophysiology of Mediterranean aromatic plants. pp 281287. Côme, D. and Corbineau, F. (Eds) Proceedings of the fourth international workshop on seeds. Basic and applied aspects of seed biology. Paris, ASFIS.Google Scholar
Thanos, C.A., Georghiou, K., Douma, D.J. and Marangaki, C.J. (1991) Photoinhibition of seed germination in Mediterranean maritime plants. Annals of Botany 68, 469475.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thanos, C.A., Georghiou, K. and Delipetrou, P. (1994) Photoinhibition of seed germination in the maritime plant Matthiola tricuspidata. Annals of Botany 73, 639644.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thanos, C.A., Kadis, C.C. and Skarou, F. (1995) Ecophysiology of germination in the aromatic plants thyme, savory and oregano (Labiatae). Seed Science Research 5, 161170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thanos, C.A., Daskalakou, E.N. and Nikolaidou, S. (1996) Early post-fire regeneration of a Pinus halepensis forest on Mount Párnis, Greece. Journal of Vegetation Science 7, 273280.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thompson, P.A. (1970) Characterization of the germination response to temperature of species and ecotypes. Nature 225, 827831.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Valdés, B. and Mejias, J.A. (1988) Contribución al estudio de la biología de la reproducción de las especies españolas de Muscari (Liliaceae). Lagascalia 15, 95103.Google Scholar
53
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Ecophysiology of seed germination in Mediterranean geophytes. 1. Muscari spp
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Ecophysiology of seed germination in Mediterranean geophytes. 1. Muscari spp
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Ecophysiology of seed germination in Mediterranean geophytes. 1. Muscari spp
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *