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Depth of dormancy in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seeds is related to the progression of the cell cycle prior to the induction of dormancy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2007

Raoul J. Bino
Affiliation:
Plant Research International, Business Unit Cell Cybernetics, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands
Henk Kieft
Affiliation:
Wageningen University, Laboratory of Plant Cell Biology, Arboretumlaan 4, 6703 BD, Wageningen, The Netherlands
Henk W.M. Hilhorst
Affiliation:
Wageningen University, Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Arboretumlaan 4, 6703 BD, Wageningen, The Netherlands
Corresponding

Abstract

Cell cycle activities are initiated following imbibition of non-dormant seeds. However, it is not known whether cell cycle related events other than DNA replication also remain suppressed in imbibed dormant seeds. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that the transitions between the non-dormant and dormant (both primary and secondary) states are reflected in cell cycle events, such as DNA replication and the changing patterns of the microtubular cytoskeleton involved in the processes of growth and development. The present studies were conducted on seeds from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Moneymaker) that possessed primary dormancy or were manipulated to attain secondary dormancy. In addition, a non-dormant abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient mutant, sitw, was used. DNA replication, as measured by flow cytometry, and β-tubulin accumulation, analysed by immunoblotting, were compared with immunocytological studies of active DNA synthesis and microtubular cytoskeleton formation. It is shown that the depth of dormancy, which distinguishes primary and secondary dormancy, may depend on the progression of the cell cycle prior to the induction of dormancy.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2001

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References

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Depth of dormancy in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seeds is related to the progression of the cell cycle prior to the induction of dormancy
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Depth of dormancy in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seeds is related to the progression of the cell cycle prior to the induction of dormancy
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