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Chlorophyll fluorescence of Brassica oleracea seeds as a non-destructive marker for seed maturity and seed performance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2008

Henk Jalink*
Affiliation:
Centre for Plant Breeding and Reproduction Research (CPRO-DLO), POB 16, NL-6700 AA Wageningen, Netherlands
Rob van der Schoor
Affiliation:
Centre for Plant Breeding and Reproduction Research (CPRO-DLO), POB 16, NL-6700 AA Wageningen, Netherlands
Angela Frandas
Affiliation:
Centre for Plant Breeding and Reproduction Research (CPRO-DLO), POB 16, NL-6700 AA Wageningen, Netherlands
Jaap G. van Pijlen
Affiliation:
Centre for Plant Breeding and Reproduction Research (CPRO-DLO), POB 16, NL-6700 AA Wageningen, Netherlands
Raoul J. Bino
Affiliation:
Centre for Plant Breeding and Reproduction Research (CPRO-DLO), POB 16, NL-6700 AA Wageningen, Netherlands

Abstract

A method is proposed for assessing the maturity and quality of seeds, based on measuring the amount of chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) signals of intact seeds. In general, the amount of chlorophyll is directly related to the degreening process and thus the maturity. Cabbage seeds (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) were separated into three subsamples based on the CF signals of the individual intact seeds. Seeds with the lowest amount of CF had the highest percentage of germination and normal seedlings. In a controlled deterioration test, the subsample with the lowest CF signal had slightly lower germination and normal seedling percentages than the non-treated seeds, whereas the seeds with the highest CF signals had much lower germination and normal seedling percentages. Advantages of the CF method for determining seed maturity and seed quality are its high sensitivity and fully non-destructive nature and the high speed at which the fluorescence is generated and measured.

Type
Physiology & Biochemistry
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1998

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Chlorophyll fluorescence of Brassica oleracea seeds as a non-destructive marker for seed maturity and seed performance
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