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Article contents

System-controlled user interaction within the service robotic control architecture MASSiVE

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2007

Oliver Prenzel
Affiliation:
Institute of Automation, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
Christian Martens
Affiliation:
Rheinmetall Defence Electronics GmbH, LTMR, Bremen, Germany
Marco Cyriacks
Affiliation:
Institute of Automation, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
Chao Wang
Affiliation:
Institute of Automation, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
Axel Gräser
Affiliation:
Institute of Automation, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

This paper presents an approach to reduce the technical complexity of a service robotic system by means of systematic and well-balanced user-involvement. By taking advantage of the user's cognitive capabilities during task execution, a technically manageable robotic system, which is able to execute tasks on a high level of abstraction reliably and robustly, emerges. For the realisation of this approach, the control architecture MASSiVE has been implemented, which is used for the control of the rehabilitation robot FRIEND II. It supports task execution on the basis of a priori defined and formally verified task-knowledge. This task-knowledge contains all possible sequences of operations as well as the symbolic representation of objects required for the execution of a specific task. The seamless integration of user interactions into this task-knowledge, in combination with MASSiVE's user-adapted human–machine interface layer, enables the system to deliberately interact with the user during run-time.

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Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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