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Article contents

A novel five-degrees-of-freedom decoupled robot

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 December 2009

Jaime Gallardo-Alvarado*
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Tecnológico de Celaya, Av. Tecnológico y A. García Cubas, 38010 Celaya, GTO, México
Horacio Orozco-Mendoza
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Tecnológico de Celaya, Av. Tecnológico y A. García Cubas, 38010 Celaya, GTO, México
José M. Rico-Martínez
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, FIMEE, Universidad de Guanajuato, Salamanca – Valle de Santiago km 3.5 Salamanca, GTO, México
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: gjaime@itc.mx

Summary

In this work a new nonoverconstrained redundant decoupled robot, free of compound joints, formed from three parallel manipulators, with two moving platforms and provided with six active limbs connected to the fixed platform, called LinceJJP, is presented. Interesting applications such as multi-axis machine tools with parallel kinematic architectures, solar panels, radar antennas, and telescopes are available for this novel spatial mechanism.

Type
Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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