Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-zdfhw Total loading time: 0.285 Render date: 2022-08-18T08:55:50.094Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

Kinetostatic backflip strategy for self-recovery of quadruped robots with the selected rotation axis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 October 2021

Shengjie Wang
Affiliation:
MOE Key Laboratory of Mechanism Theory and Equipment Design, Centre for Advanced Mechanisms and Robotics, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300345, China
Kun Wang
Affiliation:
Centre for Robotics Research, King’s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, UK
Chunsong Zhang*
Affiliation:
MOE Key Laboratory of Mechanism Theory and Equipment Design, Centre for Advanced Mechanisms and Robotics, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300345, China
Jian S Dai
Affiliation:
Centre for Robotics Research, King’s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, UK
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: cszhang@tju.edu.cn

Abstract

A kinetostatic approach applied to the design of a backflip strategy for quadruped robots is proposed in this paper. Inspired by legged animals and taking the advantage of the leg workspace, this strategy provides an optimal design idea for the low-cost quadruped robots to achieve self-recovery after overturning. Through kinetostatic and energy analysis, a four-stepped backflip strategy based on the selected rotation axis with minimum energy is proposed, with a process of selection, lifting, rotating, and protection. The kinematic factors that affect the backflip are investigated, along with the relationship between the design parameters of the leg and trunk being analyzed. At the end of this paper, the strategy is validated by a simulation and experiments with a prototype called DRbot, demonstrating that the strategy endows the robot a strong self-recovery ability in various terrains.

Type
Reply
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Seok, S., Wang, A., Meng Yee, C., Otten, D., Lang, J. and Kim, S., “Design Principles for Highly Efficient Quadrupeds and Implementation on the MIT Cheetah Robot,” In: IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (2013) pp. 33073312.Google Scholar
Fukuoka, Y., Kimura, H., Hada, Y. and Takase, K., “Adaptive Dynamic Walking of a Quadruped Robot ‘Tekken’ on Irregular Terrain Using a Neural System Model,” In: IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (2003) pp. 20372042.Google Scholar
Boaventura, T., Medrano-Cerda, G. A., Semini, C., Buchli, J. and Caldwell, D. G., “Stability and Performance of the Compliance Controller of the Quadruped Robot HyQ,” In: IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (2013) pp. 14581464.Google Scholar
Iida, F. and Pfeifer, R., “Self-stabilization and Behavioral Diversity of Embodied Adaptive Locomotion,” In: Embodied Artificial Intelligence: International Seminar, (Dagstuhl Castle, Germany, July 7–11, 2003). Revised Papers. pp. 119–129 (Springer Berlin Heidelberg, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, Z. G. and Kimura, H., “Rush: A simple and autonomous quadruped running robot,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng. I J. Syst. Cont. Eng. 223(3), 323336 (2009).Google Scholar
Raibert, M., Blankespoor, K., Nelson, G. and Playter, R., “BigDog, the rough-terrain quadruped robot,” IFAC Proc. Vol. 41(2), 1082210825 (2008).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zico Kolter, J. and Ng, A. Y., “The Stanford LittleDog: A learning and rapid replanning approach to quadruped locomotion,” Int. J. Robot. Res. 30(2), 150174 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, X., Gao, F., Qi, C., Tian, X. and Zhang, J., “Spring parameters design for the new hydraulic actuated quadruped robot,” J. Mech. Robot. 6(2), 021003 (2014).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mao, L. H., Tian, Y., Gao, F., Zhao, Y., “Novel method of gait switching in six-legged robot walking on continuous-nondifferentiable terrain by utilizing stability and interference criteria,” Sci. China Technol. Sci. 63, 25272540 (2020).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, C. S. and Dai, J. S., “Trot gait with twisting trunk of a metamorphic quadruped robot,” J. Bionic Eng. 15(6), 971981 (2018).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tang, Z.,Qi, P. and Dai, J. S., “Mechanism design of a biomimetic quadruped robot,” Ind. Robot Int. J. 44(4), 512520 (2017).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, C., Zhang, C., Dai, J. S. and Qi, P., “Stability margin of a metamorphic quadruped robot with a twisting trunk,” J. Mech. Robot. 11(6), 113 (2019).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McGhee, R. B. and Frank, A. A., “On the stability properties of quadruped creeping gaits,” Mathematical Biosciences 3, 331351 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mcghee, R. B. and Iswandhi, G. I., “Adaptive locomotion of a multilegged robot over rough terrain,” IEEE Trans. Syst. Man Cybern. 9(4), 176–182 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, C. D. and Song, S. M., “Gaits and geometry of a walking chair for the disabled,” J. Terramech. 26(3), 211233 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, C. D. and Song, S. M., “Stability analysis of wave-crab gaits of a quadruped,” J. Robot. Syst. 7(2), 243276 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Messuri, D. and Klein, C., “Automatic body regulation for maintaining stability of a legged vehicle during rough-terrain locomotion,” IEEE J. Robot. Automat. 1(3), 132141 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hirai, K., Hirose, M., Haikawa, Y. and Takenaka, T., “The Development of Honda Humanoid Robot,” In: IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (1998) pp. 13211326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spyrakos-Papastavridis, E., Dai, J. S., Childs, P. R. N. and Tsagarakis, N. G., “Selective-compliance-based lagrange model and multilevel noncollocated feedback control of a humanoid robot,” J. Mech. Robot. 10(3), 031009 (2018).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hof, A. L., Gazendam, M. G. J. and Sinke, W. E., “The condition for dynamic stabilityJ. Biomech. 38(1), 18 (2005).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Garcia, E. and de Santos, P. G., “An improved energy stability margin for walking machines subject to dynamic effects,” Robotica 23(1), 1320 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yoneda, K. and Hirose, S., “Tumble Stability Criterion of Integrated Locomotion and Manipulation,” In: IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (1996) pp. 870876.Google Scholar
Zhang, C., Chai, X. and Dai, J. S., “Preventing Tumbling with a Twisting Trunk for the Quadruped Robot: Origaker I,” In: ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (2018) p. V05BT07A010.Google Scholar
Tunstel, E., “Evolution of Autonomous Self-Righting Behaviors for Articulated Nanorovers,” In: Artificial Intelligence, Robotics and Automation in Space (1999) pp. 341–346.Google Scholar
Hale, E., Schara, N., Burdick, J. and Fiorini, P., “A Minimally Actuated Hopping Rover for Exploration of Celestial Bodies,” In: Proceedings 2000 ICRA. Millennium Conference. IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. Symposia Proceedings (Cat. No.00CH37065) (2000), pp. 420427.Google Scholar
Li, C., Kessens, C. C., Young, A., Fearing, R. S. and Full, R. J., “Cockroach-Inspired Winged Robot Reveals Principles of Ground-Based Dynamic Self-Righting,” In: IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (2016) pp. 21282134.Google Scholar
Riphaus, T., Hoffmann, F. and Labisch, S., “Righting of Chinese mitten crabs (Eriocheir Sinensis) and their models,” Acta Polytech. CTU Proc. 7, 5357 (2016).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kessens, C. C. and Dotterweich, J., “Ground-Based Self-Righting Using Inertial Appendage Methods,” In: Unmanned Systems Technology XIX. International Society for Optics and Photonics, 1019505 (SPIE, Anaheim, 2017).Google Scholar
Saranli, U., Buehler, M. and Koditschek, D. E., “RHex: a simple and highly mobile hexapod robot,” Int. J. Robot. Res. 20(7), 616631 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Saranli, U. and Koditschek, D. E., Design and Analysis of a Flipping Controller for RHex, (Michigan Univ Ann Arbor Dept of Electrical Engineering and Science, Michigan, 2003) pp. 19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peng, S., Ding, X., Yang, F. and Xu, K., “Motion planning and implementation for the self-recovery of an overturned multi-legged robot,” Robotica 35(5), 11071120 (2017).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kanehiro, F., Kaneko, K., Fujiwara, K., Harada, K., Kajita, S., Yokoi, K. and Isozumi, T., “The First Humanoid Robot that has the Same Size as a Human and That Can Lie Down and Get Up,” In: IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Taipei, Taiwan (September 14–19, 2003), 1633–1639.Google Scholar
Semini, C., Tsagarakis, N. G., Guglielmino, E., Focchi, M., Cannella, F. and Caldwell, D. G., “Design of HyQ – A hydraulically and electrically actuated quadruped robot,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng. I J. Syst. Cont. Eng. 225(6), 831849 (2011).Google Scholar
Hutter, M., Gehring, C., Lauber, A., Gunther, F., Bellicoso, C. D., Tsounis, V., Fankhauser, P., Diethelm, R., Bachmann, S., Bloesch, M., Kolvenbach, H., Bjelonic, M., Isler, L. and Meyer, K., “ANYmal - toward legged robots for harsh environments,” Adv. Robot. 31(17), 918931 (2017).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Katz, B., Carlo, J. D. and Kim, S., “Mini Cheetah: A Platform for Pushing the Limits of Dynamic Quadruped Control,” In: IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (2019) pp. 62956301.Google Scholar
Kau, N., Schultz, A., Ferrante, N. and Slade, P., “Stanford Doggo: An Open-Source, Quasi-Direct-Drive Quadruped,” In: International Conference on Robotics and Automation (2019) pp. 6309–6315.Google Scholar
Spyrakos-Papastavridis, E. and Dai, J. S., “A Model-Free Solution for Stable Balancing and Locomotion of Floating-Base Legged Systems,” In: IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (2020) pp. 38163822.Google Scholar
Li, M., Kang, R., Branson, D. T. and Dai, J. S., “Model-free control for continuum robots based on an adaptive Kalman filter,” IEEE/ASME Trans. Mechatron. 23(1), 286–297 (2018).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Domokos, G. and Várkonyi, P. L., “Geometry and self-righting of turtles,” Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 275(1630), 1117 (2008).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ruhr, I. M., Rose, K. A. R., Sellers, W. I., Crossley, D. A. and Codd, J. R., “Turning turtle: Scaling relationships and self-righting ability in Chelydra serpentina,” Proceedings. Biological Sciences 288(1946), 20210213 (2021).Google Scholar
Full, R. J., Yamauchi, A. and Jindrich, D. L., “Maximum single leg force production: Cockroaches righting on photoelastic gelatin,” J. Exp. Biol. 198(12), 24412452 (1995).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Full, R. J., Yamauchi, A. and Jindrich, D. L., “Air righting without the cervical righting reflex in adult rats,” Behav. Brain Res. 45, 24412452 (1995).Google Scholar
Zhang, J., Li, J., Li, C., Z.Wu, H. Liang and J.Wu, “Self-righting physiology of the ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata on surfaces with variable roughness,” J. Insect Physiol. 130, 104202 (2021).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Faisal, A. and Matheson, T., “Coordinated righting behaviour in locusts,” J. Exp. Biol. 204(4), 637648 (2001).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dai, J. S., “Euler–Rodrigues formula variations, quaternion conjugation and intrinsic connections,” Mech. Mach. Theory 92, 144152 (2015).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dai, J. S., “Finite displacement screw operators with embedded Chasles’ motion,” J. Mech. Robot. 4(4), 041002 (2012).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dai, J. S., Holland, N. and Kerr, D. R., “Finite twist mapping and its application to planar serial manipulators with revolute joints,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng. C J. Mech. Eng. Sci. 209(4), 263271 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cui, L. and Dai, J. S., “Posture, workspace, and manipulability of the metamorphic multifingered hand with an articulated palm,” J. Mech. Robot. 3(2), 021001 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Kinetostatic backflip strategy for self-recovery of quadruped robots with the selected rotation axis
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Kinetostatic backflip strategy for self-recovery of quadruped robots with the selected rotation axis
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Kinetostatic backflip strategy for self-recovery of quadruped robots with the selected rotation axis
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *