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Article contents

The joint velocity, torque, and power capability evaluation of a redundant parallel manipulator

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2010

Yongjie Zhao*
Affiliation:
Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Shantou University, Shantou City, Guangdong 515063, P. R. China Shantou Institute for Light Industrial Equipment Research, Shantou City, Guangdong 515021, P. R. China
Feng Gao
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P. R. China Email: fengg@sjtu.edu.cn
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: meyjzhao@yahoo.com.cn

Summary

The evaluation of joint velocity, torque, and power capability of the 8-PSS redundant parallel manipulator is investigated in this paper. A series of new joint capability indices with obvious physical meanings are presented. The torque index used to evaluate the respective joint dynamic capability of the redundant parallel manipulator is decoupled into the acceleration, velocity, and gravity term. With these velocity, torque, and power indices, it is possible to control the respective joint capability of the redundant parallel manipulator in different directions. The indices have been applied to evaluate the joint capability of the redundant parallel manipulator by simulation. They are general and can be used for other types of parallel manipulators.

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Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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