Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-jcwnq Total loading time: 0.176 Render date: 2021-10-16T06:38:52.211Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Dynamic grasping of an arbitrary polyhedral object

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2012

Akihiro Kawamura*
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 819-0395, Japan
Kenji Tahara
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 819-0395, Japan
Ryo Kurazume
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 819-0395, Japan
Tsutomu Hasegawa
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 819-0395, Japan
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: kawamura@irvs.ait.kyushu-u.ac.jp

Summary

This paper proposes a novel dynamic stable grasping method of an arbitrary polyhedral object for a hand-arm system with hemispherical fingertips. This method makes it possible to satisfy the force/torque equilibrium condition for the immobilization of the object without knowledge of the object. Two control signals are proposed which generate grasping forces normal and tangential to an object surface in a final state. The dynamics of the overall system is modeled and analyzed theoretically. We demonstrate the stable grasping of an arbitrary polyhedral object using the proposed controller through numerical simulations and experiments using a newly developed mechanical hand-arm system.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1.Cutkosky, M. R., Robotic Grasping and Fine Manipulation (Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, Netherlands, 1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2.Murray, R. M., Li, Z. and Sastry, S. S., Mathematical Introduction to Robotic Manipulation (CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 1994).Google Scholar
3.Shimoga, K. B., “Robot grasp synthesis algorithms: A survey,” Int. J. Robot. Res. 15 (3), 230266 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4.Okamura, A. M., Smaby, N. and Cutkosky, M. R., “An Overview of Dexterous Manipulation,” In: Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, San Francisco, CA (2000) pp. 255262.Google Scholar
5.Bicchi, A., “Hands for dexterous manipulation and robust grasping: A difficult road towards simplicity,” IEEE Trans. Robot. Automat. 16 (6), 652662 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6.Bicchi, A., “On the closure properties of robotic grasping,” Int. J. Robot. Res. 14 (4), 319334 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7.Arimoto, S., Nguyen, P. T. A., Han, H.-Y. and Doulgeri, Z., “Dynamics and control of a set of dual fingers with soft tips,” Robotica 18 (1), 7180 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8.Arimoto, S., “A differential-geometric approach for 2-D and 3-D object grasping and manipulation,” Annu. Rev. Control 31 (2), 189209 (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9.Arimoto, S., Control Theory of Multi-Fingered Hands. A Modelling and Analytical-Mechanics Approach for Dexterity and Intelligence (Springer, New York, 2008).Google Scholar
10.Montana, D., “The kinematics of contact and grasp,” Int. J. Robot. Res. 7 (3), 1732 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11.Cole, A., Hauser, J. and Satry, S., “Kinematics and control of multifingered hands with rolling contacts,” IEEE Trans. Automat. Contr. 34 (4), 398404 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12.Han, L. and Trincle, J., “Dexterous manipulation by rolling and finger gaiting,” In: Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Leuven, Belgium (1998) pp. 730735.Google Scholar
13.Harada, K., Kaneko, M. and Tsuji, T., “Rolling-based manipulation for multiple objects,” In: Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, San Francicso, CA (2000) pp. 38873894.Google Scholar
14.Tahara, K., Arimoto, S. and Yoshida, M., “Dynamic Force/Torque Equilibrium for Stable Grasping by a Triple Robotic Fingers System,” In: Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conferences on Intelligent and Robotic Systems, St. Louis, MO (2009) pp. 22572263.Google Scholar
15.Tahara, K., Arimoto, S. and Yoshida, M., “Dynamic Object Manipulation Using a Virtual Frame by a Triple Soft-Fingered Robotic Hand,” In: Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Anchorage, AK (2010) 43224327.Google Scholar
16.Bae, J.-H., Arimoto, S., Ozawa, R., Sekimoto, M. and Yoshida, M., “A Unified Control Scheme for a Whole Robotic Arm-Fingers System in Grasping and Manipulation,” In: Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Orlando, FL (2006) pp. 21312136.Google Scholar
17.Kawamura, A., Tahara, K., Kurazume, R. and Hasegawa, T., “Dynamic Object Manipulation Using a Multi-Fingered Hand-Arm System: Enhancement of a Grasping Capability Using Relative Attitude Constraints of Fingers,” In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Advanced Robotics, St. Paul, MN (2011) pp. 814.Google Scholar
8
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Dynamic grasping of an arbitrary polyhedral object
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Dynamic grasping of an arbitrary polyhedral object
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Dynamic grasping of an arbitrary polyhedral object
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *